History of table tennis

History of table tennis
History of table tennis
Table tennis (also known as Ping-pong) originated from England in the nineteenth century. Upper class Victorians would be playing a crude of version of table tennis after dinner parties. They were trying to recreate another sport which was tennis. But instead of playing outside they would play inside the house. Any type of objects in the house that could be used to play table tennis was used. The house table was used as a Ping-pong table. A line of books was used for the net. A rubber ball or a champagne cork would be used as the ball. And a lid off of a cigar box would used as a racket. Very peculiar indeed. Although all sports were originally created in a crude way. The name Ping-pong comes from the sound it made when it was hit back and forth. Ping-pong became more popular as time went on and the sport became more refined. A manufacturer J. Jacques & Son Ltd actually trademarked the name. He is the one that actually started manufacturing the equipment. Later on he would sell the trademark Ping-pong to the Parker Brothers. Ping-pong was very popular in Europe for a time and was even introduced to other countries particularly Asia. For a time the sport was abandoned in Europe and later revived in the 1920’s. Since Ping-pong was taken they would have to revert back to the name table tennis. Refinements to the sport table tennis started sprouting up. Starting with the ball. A man name James Gibb (a passionate table tennis enthusiast) discovered celluloid balls during the trip to the U.S. and thought it would be great for table tennis. Another man named E.C. Goode made the modern version of the racket. He used pimpled rubber on a wooden blade which replaced the old cigar lid boxes. In 1921, the Table Tennis Association was created in England to help organize and refine the game. Then in 1926, the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) was created for globalization of table tennis. The first official championship was hosted in London the following year. Table tennis has also been accepted as an Olympic sport since 1988. In 1950, the foam rubber paddle was introduced to table tennis. It dramatically changed the way table tennis was played by introducing greater speed and spin. Interesting Tidbit on Table Tennis During the year 1971, the US table tennis team had a special invitation to play in China. The whole team crossed a bridge from Hong Kong to the mainland of China. Why is this significant you ask? These Americans were the first group to be allowed back in the country since the communist took over in 1949. This was one of the first signs of improving relations with China. Talk about table tennis having a big impact in the world.
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