Guide to repairing endpapers

Guide to repairing endpapers
Guide to repairing endpapers
The beginning and ending couple of pages in a hardback book are called endpapers. This serves two purposes, to make sure the cover doesn’t warp, and to protect the text. Adhesive reaction, direction of grainm, and strength should be establish when machine-produced papers of specific weight are used. By utilizing handmade papers you may add some sentimental value to the book but it could also increase the difficulty in the completion of the repair job or jobs that are needed. The simplest way to repair a tear in your endpapers is book repair tape. Availability of this may be found online via various distributors or in craft stores. I don’t advise the use of standard adhesive tape, because it can discolor and become brittle as time passes. As a result you will have to mend the tear again. To necessitate minimal trimming, book tape is available in many widths. You can also line up the edges of the tear with a needle, and paste about 1/8″ on either side, then press thin Japanese tissue over it. Press down completely to remove and air on both sides of the page. Put waxed paper on both sides of the reaper, shut the book, and leave it to dry. You ought to be able to remove the extra tissue and smooth down the repair when it is dry. Use tissue that is set using heat for a more professional look. The tissue comes with easily understandable directions, so I won’t state them again. As I said previously, endpapers are applied to make up for the outside twisted covers and could become loose or fall off of the cover through years of use. Doing this repair work, will teach you some basic bookbinding skills. “Tipping In” the endpapers is the cheapest and weakest repair to make. This requires a small line of paste down the spine of the book, and then the endpapers are attached to the first or last page of your book. Paste works better than glue for this task and can be smoother and fresher making a more usable bond. If you have to substitute the endpapers, you should remember two things. Starting off, endpapers should be made larger than needed and trimmed later, because it is difficult to join papers together accurately. To avoid problems, make sure that the grain direction of your paper runs from head to tail, or in other words, from top to bottom. If you need an expert at custom bookbinding, consider Tightly Bound Books where you’ll receive Book Repair With Personal Care. Click the links to visit their website and see a gallery of their work. As their motto states, they provide “Book repair with personal care.”
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