The Path to Graduate School

The Path to Graduate School
The Path to Graduate School
Deciding to go to graduate school can be an overwhelming and somewhat daunting task. Whether it happens immediately following your undergraduate studies or years later, it’s a process that demands much time and contemplation in order to confirm it is the right decision for you.

The time and contemplation aspect of applying to graduate school may develop in a variety of ways, but self-awareness and reflection are often the most validating means of coming to the right conclusion regarding your future path. The thought process may begin while doing your undergraduate work or it may come years later, but it is important to give ample time to consider if this is the right choice and, specifically, which subject you would like to continue your advance education in. Consulting other professionals in fields of your interest is an excellent and comprehensive approach to acquire information on what steps to take. You may find graduate school isn’t the best direction to head! But, if it is and you have given yourself time and consideration of all options to the decision of applying, it is now important to simplify the process so it’s not overwhelming or so daunting that you don’t go through with it.

First, research which locations are right for you and continue your search based on what colleges are in that area. Once you have a list of possible schools, make sure they have a graduate program that will fit your needs. Whether your list of potential schools is one or 15, you need to start scrutinizing the application process, which tests are required, what other documentation is needed etc. It may be time-consuming to organize all the details just to start applying, but the more organized you are on the front-end the smoother the process will be on the back end. And finally, confirm what test is required for admissions.

Most, if not all graduate programs want one of the following test scores: Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), Law School Admission Test (LSAT), Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) or the Miller’s Analogy Test (MAT). Most standardized, graduate-school tests are designed to identify potential success, or one’s capacity for success, rather than measuring specific knowledge or achievement. While some subject knowledge is mandatory (the Medical College Admission Test, for example), most standardized tests seek to judge a candidate’s thinking skills. Obtain proper study-guides for the test you will need and get started on applying to graduate school!
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/07/

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