Living at Home during College

Living at Home during College
Living at Home during College
College is a time when students are supposed to gain independence by living on their own for the first time. It’s an opportunity to experience real freedom; no longer are mom and dad nearby to micromanage your every move. But if your parents happen to live within driving distance from your school of choice, you might find yourself wondering whether or not leaving home is the best choice.

If you’re considering staying home for college, it’s important that your relationship with your parents is strong. Now that you’re an adult, you expect to be treated as one. But it’s not unusual for moms and dads to continue to treat their children as just that – children – even though they’re old enough to live on their own. If your parents usually respect your boundaries and you respect theirs, it should be a mutually beneficial experience. They’ll have the privilege of keeping their kid around for a few more years, and all parties involved will save money. At most colleges, room and board costs at least a few thousand dollars per year, and according to the College Board, students were projected to pay $377 to $420 more on average during the 2009-10 school year. Costs are always on the rise and if your parents can’t afford them, you could find yourself deep in debt after graduation. Plus, you run the risk of being stuck with an unpleasant and inconsiderate roommate. Who wants to pay thousands of dollars to have their food eaten, belongings abused and sleep disrupted? You get to avoid the adjustment period that most college students have to endure after they move to campus. You’ll never be homesick and staying close to family and friends will make it easier to deal with the new challenges thrown your way.

On the other hand, you miss out on the learning experience that comes with living on your own for the first time. People tend to find out the most about themselves when they’re removed from their comfort zones. You’d be forced to deal with people you may not like, and in the meantime, you’d have more opportunities to make friends. Becoming a part of campus allows you to become a part of your college’s culture – it’s easier to join organizations and frequent nearby hotspots when you’re just walking distance away. And academically you’d have a better chance for success because professors, tutors and the library are always nearby. Studies have shown that students who live on campus are more likely to achieve high GPAs and graduate on time. But what works for many of your peers may not work for you. Living at home during college could be the right decision depending on your circumstances and personal preferences.
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/05/

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