Acing Your First Job Interview

Acing Your First Job Interview
Acing Your First Job Interview
Giving a job interview can be more frightening than the most difficult of exam in college. It’s your first test from the real world. If you ace it, you’ll be able to move on to the next stage of your life. If you fail it, you’ll have to take it again, delaying the start of you career and leaving you stuck between childhood and adulthood. But just like with any exam, your preparation will determine the end result.

After securing an interview, take time to study up on your prospective employer. Know the details pertaining to the history of the company, its goals, the CEO, your boss, your interviewers and your job. Much of that information can be found on the company’s website, but if it isn’t, perform a Google search or speak with people who may be familiar with it. Showing that you’re knowledgeable about the company during the interview will give your interviewers the impression that you really want the job. It’s also important that you dress appropriately. Unless instructed otherwise, always wear a suit regardless of the nature of the job; it shows that you’re a professional person who’s taking the job interview seriously. If you’re a guy, wear a navy or dark grey two-piece suit with a long-sleeved white or blue shirt and a tie. You’ll need solid dark socks that reach to mid-calf, business shoes that are black or cordovan, and a belt of the same color. Facial hair and jewelry should be worn conservatively – if at all. If you’re a gal, wear navy, dark grey, black or brown two-piece suits. It can come with either pants or a knee-length and non-billowing skirt. Wear a matching blouse underneath the jacket, and microfiber or leather shoes. Makeup and jewelry should be worn conservatively, and very little cleavage should be shown.

When the day comes, be sure that you’re well-rested and mentally sharp. Be confident but no cocky. You want your interviewers to think you’re fit for the job but don’t feel entitled to it. Be respectful and never interrupt them. Listen to what they have to say and try to engage in a conversation. If you establish chemistry between you and your interviewers, you’ll be more likely to get the job. Save any questions you may have gathered during the preparation process until after they’re finished speaking. Also be sure to mix in a couple of questions related to the information given to you during the interview; it shows that you paid close attention. But don’t ask too many questions – after all, you’re the one who’s being interviewed. After you’re finished, go home and compose a thank you letter. It can be hand written or sent by email. Restate why you’re qualified for the position and express your gratitude for the opportunity. If you give an interview the attention it deserves, you’ll improve your chances of acing it, and you just might earn an invitation to the real world.
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/05/

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