Going Back to School to Work

Going Back to School to Work
Going Back to School to Work
During undergraduate or graduate school, many students choose to work on campus in work-study programs or as regular part-time employees. Campus bookstores, engineering workshops, chemistry labs, the library, department offices and campus publishing offices all hold opportunities for flexible, convenient employment for students. Your "boss" may very well be someone you see every day anyway, and understands that certain times of the semester are more stressful than others, and that you may have to cut back your hours. But have you ever thought about returning to your alma mater as an alumnus or alumna — not to get another degree but to work as a full-time, salaried employee?

While some students may feel like escaping as far away as possible from their colleges the moment they graduate, others may appreciate the familiarity and camaraderie of working in the university environment, even if not right away. You have probably already built up at least some kind of network among faculty members and administrators, live in the city, and can appreciate the standard for most basic procedures and systems at the school. Colleges and universities sometimes give preference to alumni over other job candidates, as they can vouch for the quality of your education, can easily contact your references and look up your records, and show the outside community that students and alumni have a tight bond with the university.

Obviously, the types of jobs available to you may be limited depending on your degree, but visiting a career counselor on campus can be a great way to find out ways you can transfer your academic preparation to skills needed around campus. The admissions office, marketing department, counseling center, communications and public relations office, and alumni relations offices are all great areas to look for full-time work through your university.

Some students may feel that they haven’t really graduated if they stick around campus to work for the university, but your life as a working professional will be much different than it was as a student. You’ll form more collaborative relationships with people you once considered exclusively as superiors. You will also be invited to attend meetings, make decisions concerning the future of the university, and feel connected to the community in a more inclusive way that you probably didn’t feel before. Working for your university after college can also be a bridge opportunity between graduation and work in the real world. If you find that it’s hard to find a job elsewhere in the community, consider sticking around for another year or two, as a paid employee.
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/05/

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