Basic Study Tips for College Freshmen

Basic Study Tips for College Freshmen
Basic Study Tips for College Freshmen
At first glance, you might think that you have a lot in common with your fellow college freshman: you’re all new to the school, you’re the same age, and you probably share some common interests, background, financial status or philosophies about life since you chose to attend the same school. But college admissions councils pick diverse groups of students on purpose, and you probably have a lot to learn from your classmates. One way in which college freshmen differ from each other upon first arrival at school is their academic preparation. You have all demonstrated some sort of similar ability on test scores, essays and GPAs, but since you come from different high schools, your academic experience may have been more or less rigorous than your roommate’s. While she may be used to all-nighters for exams, you may have only had to review a study guide 10 minutes before class in order to make an A. If you’re nervous about how you’ll compete — or even collaborate — with more prepared students during your early days in college, don’t be. There are some simple steps to condition yourself to become a university-level scholar in no time.

On your first day of class, when your professor passes out a syllabus, keep it. Professors drift away from syllabi from time to time, but overall they love them, and the syllabus can be your key to getting As, participating in class discussions, and understanding how each piece of information you learn relates to the class theme as a whole. Each week you should review it to make sure you haven’t missed assignments, as well as to look ahead for required and suggested reading that will prepare you for the next class.

Doing a little studying each day will help tremendously when it comes to retaining information, building upon fundamental concepts, and simply keeping up with your homework. Besides the specific assignments set by your teachers, make smaller, daily goals for yourself for each class, even if you don’t have it that day. For example, if you have to read 50 pages and answer online discussion questions by Thursday and it’s currently Monday, read 25 pages today, 25 pages Tuesday, and work on the questions when you have time in between, finishing them on Wednesday. You’ll save time in the long run, and you’ll retain the material longer.

Besides differences in academic preparation, college students also prefer different ways of studying. You’ll quickly figure out if study groups or independent studying works best for you, or if you tend to rely on a mixture of both. By doing a little each day and always looking ahead for the next assignment or discussion, you’ll avoid getting behind and overwhelmed.
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/05/

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