Pesky Grammar & Spelling Blunders to Master before College

Pesky Grammar & Spelling Blunders to Master before College
Pesky Grammar & Spelling Blunders to Master before College
One of the wonders of today’s education system is that we can make it through high school quite easily and still not have a solid foundation in grammar and spelling. However, you can’t do this as easily in college. To help you avoid the embarrassment associated with getting your first college English composition paper back bleeding with red correction marks, we will discuss a few of the most glaring grammar and spelling mistakes that tempt professors in all subjects to pull their hair out and release a blood-curdling scream. If you can master these major baddies before college, you’ll be one giant step ahead of the rest.

Three of the most commonly mixed up words are there, their, and they’re. Instead of just guessing on these like many people do, take the time to learn the simple rules involved, using the process of elimination to determine proper usage. They’re is a contraction for they are, so if the words they are don’t make sense in the sentence, you’ll know that’s not the correct usage. That’s an easy one. There has to do with place, or where something is. Examples: "The yogurt is over there" or "There is the remote control." Their, however, is always possessive and has to do with ownership. An example: "That’s their house on the right" or "Their bad attitude ruined the party." Make sure it answers the question "Whose is it?" before using the word their.

Another big error to master before college is confusing the words lose and loose. Here’s a silly, yet easy, way to remember the difference between these similar words. If you’ve lost something, that means something’s gone missing, right? Well, just remember that if you are trying to express that something is lost, an extra o has gone missing. So if you’re trying to express "I hope I don’t lose my notes," you’ll know not to spell lose with two o‘s because the second o has gone missing.

Last, but not least, are the words its and it’s and your and you’re. The trick here is to remember that it’s is a contraction representing the words it is. Its, however, is always possessive. Example: "The dog lost its bone." The case is similar with your and you’re. You’re represents the words you are and your is always possessive.

Also, be sure to visit your college’s writing center so someone can proofread your paper before you turn it in. They’ll point out major mistakes and typos, such as using the word "pubic" rather than "public" in your essay headline. Spell check won’t catch this, and you’ll never live it down if you do it!
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/03/

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