RIAA Cracking Down on College Downloaders

RIAA Cracking Down on College Downloaders
RIAA Cracking Down on College Downloaders
Blazing fast Internet speed capable of downloading all 21 Led Zeppelin albums – including the three live and nine compilation ones, mind you – in less time than it takes to finish a load of laundry is a hard thing for college students to resist. This is especially true for college students who are too strapped for cash to shell out a dollar per song on iTunes or $20 for a physical CD from the record store. While music is not the only thing that is being illegally downloaded on university campuses these days, as movies and computer software are also common targets, the music industry is the strongest force of opposition that is going out of its way to stop illegal file sharing and downloading in both private homes and school grounds.

Since Napster was launched in 2001, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has been chasing after those who partake in illegal file sharing of copyrighted songs, including those who upload the music as well as those who download the music. These days, students use a variety of downloading tools, including torrent platforms like uTorrent and BitTorrent as well as direct peer-to-peer platforms like Limewire. The RIAA, working on behalf of major record labels, uses a script that automatically sifts through the bustling World Wide Web for the names of copyrighted songs. Once found, the script searches for the IP addresses of those connected with illegally sharing those songs. Unfortunately, many file-sharing programs have little protection against sharing IP addresses. The script then sends the IP addresses to RIAA headquarters where resident experts use the IP addresses to track down the exact physical location of the individuals responsible. These individuals are usually hit with a letter from the RIAA office, warning them of impending fines, which can reach up to $150,000 per illegally downloaded song, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s The Tech.

Those downloading from university campuses are not immune to being charged, nor invisible from being caught. In fact, two Boston University students were charged with music piracy in 2007 when the RIAA uncovered their IP addresses. However, the RIAA remained blind to the actual identities of the students due to a ruling that the university could not reveal the names of the charged students to the suing record companies due to privacy issues. Though these students ultimately got away, the case remains a solemn reminder to students everywhere that if they download on campus, they can still be tracked, identified, and charged.
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/03/

RIAA Cracking Down on College Downloaders 7.3 of 10 on the basis of 2747 Review.