Beyond Toga Parties: Academic Fraternities

Beyond Toga Parties: Academic Fraternities
Beyond Toga Parties: Academic Fraternities
Most of the time when people think of social organizations at universities, the first words that pop into their heads are the Greek social fraternities and sororities. Who wouldn’t want to be connected to a brotherhood or sisterhood, party it up and even participate in some volunteer work for the organization’s philanthropic cause?

Well, turns out there are a lot of people who are not fond of this idea. Some college students are not attracted to the steep initiation fees and catty social hierarchy and drama associated with some of these groups—not to mention the complicated pledging process involving humiliating and sometimes dangerous hazing rituals that have given some fraternities a bad name. While there are certainly benefits to joining such social organizations, don’t forget that there are other options available to suit your interests outside of those organizations, including academic fraternities and honors societies.

Academic fraternities are limited to students who have kept their grades up to a high standard by making studying a priority in their college experience. For instance, Phi Eta Sigma National Honors Society membership is open to college freshmen who have maintained a 3.5 cumulative GPA or higher and rank in the top 20 percent of their class while taking a full course load. The good news is that the national membership fee for Phi Eta Sigma is only $20, plus whatever your local dues are. Compare that to certain chapters of the popular Greek social fraternity Tae Kappa Epsilon (TKE), which assesses a $90 candidate fee, a $238 initiation fee, plus local dues!

Academic fraternities are also great because they connect their members to tons of scholarships, look excellent on a resume and can even help connect you to job opportunities after college. They also hold conventions with leadership workshops where you can network with your peers and gain key skills for the workplace. While Phi Eta Sigma is for freshman, some academic fraternities limit their membership to juniors and seniors, or to those who excel in the liberal arts. Phi Kappa Phi, for instance, has a membership limited to college juniors and seniors, and is very selective.

So if you are more interested in hitting the books than chugging down the brews at the next toga party, try looking in to the local honors society chapters available at your university. You may discover your perfect niche.
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/03/

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