College Radio: Why It’s So Good

College Radio: Why It’s So Good
College Radio: Why It’s So Good
If you think music doesn’t get any better than American Top 40 with Ryan Seacrest, then you may want to bypass this entry. However, if you believe most of the best music out there simply doesn’t get the kind of radio airplay it deserves, you may want to keep reading.

College radio stations have traditionally gathered small audiences that generally include university students, faculty and staff, and a small number of committed fans outside the university who are bored with radio as usual. College radio is a good place to pick up the newest noise from more under-the-radar artists and bands such as the Dirty Projectors, She & Him, Animal Collective and Ratatat. Haven’t heard of them? Well, sometimes that’s the point. Many of us get so used to listening to the same music over and over on loops that we can get tricked into thinking that’s all that’s out there. College radio proves over and over that good music doesn’t have to be cut-and-paste and tailored for the masses.

While Sirius, XM Radio and Pandora have opened new horizons for good, often independent music, many people forget that quality, out-of-the-ordinary tunes can be found on your neighborhood university radio station. The advantage of college radio over Sirius and XM (besides the fact that it’s free) is that you can catch up on the music coming out of your local college scene. The DJs are also much more easily accessible than mainstream radio DJs, and are known for being highly responsive to requests for certain songs or programming. While Sirius, XM and Pandora all provide vast genre options, college radio stations manage to accomplish this feat with one station.

For instance, Radio K, the acclaimed college radio station out of University of Minnesota—Twin Cities, plays a wide variety of genres. Recent Sunday programming included international music, Rude Radio (ska music) and Out of Step (punk music). Stations like this manage to provide diverse programming while training students for careers in radio. Another example of good college radio is Rice Radio, which emerges from Houston’s Rice University and provides diverse programming ranging from hip-hop to metal to jazz, and from Americana to Africana. Rice Radio also features funk, electronica, local jams, sixties, blues and reggae. That’s a great mix to have all in one place.

The best thing about college radio? When you graduate or move from your college town, you can still catch your favorite tunes, as most of them are streaming online 24/7.
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/03/

College Radio: Why It’s So Good 7.5 of 10 on the basis of 1965 Review.