College and the Non-traditional Student

College and the Non-traditional Student
College and the Non-traditional Student
Ever watched that sitcom called Community on NBC? The actor/comedian Chevy Chase plays the lone old guy attending a community college with a bunch of younger, hipper characters. Sometimes Chase’s kooky old guy character is the way we think of going back to college as a non-traditional student. If you’ve ever wanted to go back to college as an older adult but don’t wanted to be "that old guy" (or gal) that’s out of touch with youth culture, then this entry is for you.

A non-traditional student has one or several of the following characteristics: students older than 25, students who have full-time careers, students who are financially independent from their parents, and students who have children.

If you meet this criteria, first of all, realize that times have changed and you’re definitely not alone in your efforts to get your butt back in school after the traditional age of 18-24. In fact, even way back in 2002, about 40 percent of all college students were older than 25, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Also, more than 30 percent of college students who enroll in college do not complete their bachelor’s degree for one reason or another, creating a large pool of people who may decide to finish what they started many years later.

There are many reasons people decide to go back to college as an older adult. Maybe you’re working at a dead-end job and you want to improve your job prospects. Maybe you wish to pursue graduate school or learn skills for a new trade. Maybe your priorities have shifted dramatically and you wish you would have finished college rather than partying it up and dropping out of school back in the day. For any of these reasons or your own, getting that degree is a good decision. People with degrees do, after all, earn more on average and have a lower rate of unemployment than those who do not.

So what’s holding you back? Maybe you dread the idea of sitting in basic college classes alongside a bunch of 18- to 23-year-olds. So take classes online from an accredited online college and earn your degree from home. Maybe you think you’re not smart enough and hate the idea of taking remedial English or math to catch up. Well, you’ve got to start somewhere. No matter what the reason, it may be helpful to know that you’re not alone in your endeavor to go back to school as a non-traditional student. There are plenty of folks in the same boat who have gone before. Follow their lead and get that degree!
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/02/

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