How I Made A’s in College (And Why I Made B’s)

How I Made A’s in College (And Why I Made B’s)
How I Made A’s in College (And Why I Made B’s)
My cool older brother who graduated from college with academic honors despite partying his brains out gave me some good advice when I first enrolled in college — sit in the first few rows. I remember the conversation like it was yesterday, and him telling me that every class in which he chose to sit up front close to the professor, he earned one letter grade higher than the classes in which he sat in the middle or the back.

I didn’t really see the logic in the advice. Who wants to be within spitting distance of the teacher? I mean, really, how much more nerdcore can you get? Should I bring my professor an apple every other morning, too? Besides, where you sit doesn’t have anything to do with your study habits, which is really what will be the deal-breaker for grades, right? But I decided to test his advice.

Sure enough, my brother was right. I learned that the students who were more engaged in the class had a tendency to sit toward the front and they not only helped me out with notes from whatever classes I missed, but brought out my competitive nature when it came to tests. I found myself wanting to make better grades than them, which is sort of ridiculous, but it did the trick. I found that my professors perceived me as being more interested in the class than I really was, even if I was really asleep with my eyes open. Somehow, this led to me getting better grades than I expected on certain subjectively-graded assignments, like history essays. Later, when I was fishing for extra credit to pull myself up to an A in the last few weeks of class, they seemed more willing to go the extra mile for me because they knew my face.

While sitting up front is one implausible way I happened to make A’s in a lot of my classes, I should probably tell you why I made some B’s, too. Never take both of your required British literature courses in the same semester, even if there’s nothing you like better than reading. Trust me on this one. You’ll never be able to finish all of the massive reading assignments and you’ll be absolutely miserable while you try. I’m sure the same is true for American literature. Another tip: Make a few calls to potential college algebra teachers before you register for their class. Make up some sort of bogus question and listen to them talk. If you can’t understand their English, pick a different professor, no matter how much it messes with your schedule. Trust me on this one!
http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/01/

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