“Discover the Roots of your Anger and Make the Changes ” Mark D. Chapman

“Discover the Roots of your Anger and Make the Changes ” Mark D. Chapman

Anger
Anger is one of the most dynamic and forceful emotions that can be felt by a human being. In
fact, it can ─ and does ─ move a person’s very powerfully. Anger is an emotional response quite
common among humans. It is a reaction to a perceived threat towards oneself. It can also be
solicited from a perceived threat towards people important to oneself in the near future. This
perceived threat may appear to be real or imagined. This emotional response can be taken from a
perception (A Bit of Buddhist Psychology, 2003) due to a possible physical conflict, prejudice,
carelessness, disgrace, or betrayal among other contentions. Emotions are not good or bad; they
are simply part of life and it is what people choose to do with them that help decide whether they
are labeled positive or negative. If angry feelings are suppressed, they may never become
recognized or named, and this could lead to mental health problems (Identifying Anger, n.d.).
Anger turned inwards can also be the cause of many relationship problems. Moreover, anger may
trigger anxiety, which in turn may anger a person and cause varying complications (Cornelius,
1993, p. 128).

Impact
Anger is a growing problem around the world. Anger is an emotion that most people feel
frequently and strongly. Like all emotions, anger has several aspects. However, it is not just
merely an emotion, but a segment in a bigger social picture that has a pivotal role in advancing
or inhibiting actions that one may take. As long as feelings are concerned, communications and
motivations are also part of the situation. Anger is not just a personal affair; on the other hand, it
is an interpersonal issue that primarily focuses on relationships. It both communicates and
motivates individualistic or group directional action. One instance is when people are in a state
of fear. When people are anxious, this emotion is a sign that there is looming danger. Essentially,
it communicates with them and provides indispensable information regarding the status of their
surroundings. With this kind of function, it operates as a direct channel for evaluating their
threat, one that bypasses slower acting cognitive channels (Zajonc, 1980). Concretely, anger and
fear inform them that something is occurring that has the potential of damaging them (Fein,
1993, p. 24).

Anger in relationships is widespread and can interfere with one’s satisfaction and personal
happiness. People’s ultimate success in life is closely associated with how well they mange
difficult emotions such as anger. Despite this fact, most people receive little ─ if any ─
systematic training in anger management. In line with this, anger management skills are
important in the process of building good social relationships.

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