Technology's Impact on the Criminal Justice System- Australian Murder Case

Technology's Impact on the Criminal Justice System- Australian Murder Case
The investigation into the brutal bashing murder of homosexual man Felipe Flores in 1991 came to a halt when officers from the Homicide Squad has followed every lead possible to no avail. A shoe print left on the victim?s face and a description of a muscular man of 185 cm proved not concrete enough to find Flores?s killer. Before his death, Felipe Flores managed to draw blood from his attacker, and this blood was underneath his fingernails. In today?s world, forensic scientists would analyse this immediately using technologies available to them, but in 1991 this was not possible. Once nail clippings were later examined by the Department of Analytical Laboratories, the blood was determined to be a dna match to an unknown male. It took 17 years and several alleged assaults, but Paul Darcy Armstrong has now been charged with murder. Although Flores left evidence behind via the blood of his attacker, without the advancements in dna technology that have been made since 1991, Flores?s killer would never have been caught. dna technology has enabled us to place suspects at a crime scene, and given forensic scientists and officers enough evidence to convict criminals who might otherwise escape never being suspected. Therefore advances in technology allow the Australian legal system to uphold the carriage of justice which keeps our society safe and in order.
The Statute of Limitations is the statute which sets the maximum time period after events that legal proceedings about them can be begun. Currently Australia and New South Wales has no Statute of Limitations of murder, because it is such a brutal crime which is a danger to all society.
In the case of horrifically murdered Felipe Flores in 1991, the technology was simply not around at the time to analyse the blood under his fingernails and provide a dna match to an ?unknown male.? Had there been a Statute of Limitations of say, fifteen years for murder, the dna match to Armstrong seventeen years later would never have led to his arrest and upcoming trial and therefore justice would never be achieved in this case. With the new advancements with dna and other advancements, for example, the new finger print scanners available to some police, it could be argued that it is now a lot easier and quicker to catch and convict perpetrators of crimes. There would be a strong argument behind the fact that the law should be changed so that there is a Statute of Limitations on murder. There are definitely advantages to a Statute of Limitations being put in place ? such as fairness for all parties involved. Memories fade and people need to get on with their lives, without legal intrusions and reminders of the past. It would provide closure and certainty to the victim?s family and friends, and put an end to their unnecessary reliving of traumatic events. Having said this however, many victims? families may feel that they do not have closure until the person responsible has been caught.

Technology's Impact on the Criminal Justice System- Australian Murder Case 6.9 of 10 on the basis of 2573 Review.