Team Dynamics

Team Dynamics
While it is important to recognize your weaknesses, what you are not good at doing; it is far more effective to focus on your strengths, what you do more naturally and excellently. Businesses and organizations will have outstanding results when each individual?s strengths are recognized and roles assigned based on their talents and not only their knowledge and skill.
Connect with your willingness to identify your own strengths and/ or your team members? strengths and make necessary changes. Assess what results you have been experiencing. Determine if you wish to do informal self assessments or invest in professional assistance for the assessment. Take action immediately to identify strengths and make reassignments as needed. Expect to experience successful results and you will.
Have you ever been in a position where you feel less than competent, and in a different position you shine? A likely explanation is that the first position requires you to perform at what you have little or no talent for and the second position drew on your strengths.
While it is important to recognize your weaknesses, what you are not good at doing; it is far more effective to focus on your strengths, what you do more naturally and excellently. Businesses and organizations will have outstanding results when each individual?s strengths are recognized and roles assigned based on their talents and not only their knowledge and skill.
Focus on strengths: Everyone wins. Individuals are empowered and goals are achieved more easily. Individuals as well as teams perform at a higher level. Productivity increases with more ease. Creative ideas emerge more often than not; investment in individuals development has a greater return. It is more fun for everyone.
Focus on weaknesses: Individuals feel demoralized and goals may be achieved with great difficulty. They feel very stressed. Individuals and teams do not perform optimally. Much time and resources are spent on what may not be sustained changes. There is no room for creative ideas to emerge readily. Investment in training to overcome or fix weaknesses when assessed may be wasted dollars. It is not a fun environment to be in.
Teams can have unofficial, informal roles too. Some are helpful and some are not so helpful. The list below summarizes some common, informal roles in teams.

Helpful Roles
The Expert ? A knowledgeable subject matter expert who can clarify technical issues.
The Summarizer ? Often, a ?big picture? person who helps to sum up items.
The Bridge Builder ? Experienced negotiators who can help bring opposing views together.
Not Always Helpful Roles
The Joker ? Always telling jokes to the extent that others can?t accomplish their goals.
The Blocker ? Hates to make decisions, or reach closure; always looking for more information or wants to ?think things over a little bit.?
The Busier Than Thou ? Always busier, harder working and has more responsibilities than others.
The Disrupter ? If they aren?t interrupting for some reason, Disrupters like to hold side conversations or generally disturb the group.
The Loner ? Doesn?t like to participate, rarely contributes.
Teamwork"
?We work as a team around here.?
?Let?s put together a team and see what happens.?
You?ve probably heard comments like that before. Maybe you have said them yourself! Teams get a lot of talk, but what is it about some groups that makes them effective? What?s the reason some groups accomplish goals and others stumble and sputter?
Good communication is critical to effective teamwork. Communicating is far more than talking and listening. It is sometimes a complex and puzzling process. However, effective communication is possible with the right approach, techniques and some practice.
This section of the lesson is broken down into four areas. Upon completing this section, you will be able to:
? List various communication skills.
? Develop open-ended questions to facilitate dialogue.
? Turn negative comments into positive statements.
? Use the feedback formula for facilitating dialogue.
? Call for a timeout and resolve breakdowns.
All teams make decisions. Some decisions are big and impact the entire organization(How should next year?s budget be allocated among our units?). Some are small and have only minimal impact on employees (Where should next week?s meeting be held?). How to make a decision is what this module is all about. At the end, you will be able to:
? List the various kinds of decision making.
? List the elements of consensus.
? Recognize when to use consensus, and when not to.
? List the criteria and resources required for consensus
Team Leaders are responsible for moving the team to accomplish its task. Team leaders should ensure an environment that helps teams get their work done. For example, the team may need to meet off site, or require work samples, products or other items. The team leader is responsible for obtaining these resources, and if they are unavailable (e.g., no off site meeting space is available), then the team leader must inform the team of the situation and direct the team to consider other options.

Team Recorder ? Keeps Notes, Documents Decisions
The team recorder is responsible for writing down the team?s key points, ideas and decisions. Sometimes, recorders work from an easel pad. Recorders can also take notes directly to a pad.
Some thoughts to consider when assuming recorder duties:
Don?t editorialize!
Record comments verbatim as much as possible. If the recorder can?t write fast enough, ask the facilitator to slow down or repeat a comment. Recording the team?s ideas is very important, so invest the time to do it right.
Consider two recorders
If ideas are coming fast and furiously, consider using two recorders, each to write down every other suggestion.
Be prepared & organized
Recorders should review the agenda for action items. Then, he or she can prepare notes and easel pads prior to the meeting with headers like: ?Problems Under Consideration,? or ?Potential Solutions,? or ?Next Steps.?
Remember this?
The recorder is responsible for documenting the team?s process, discussions, and decisions. Every good team has a good recorder!
Coaches try to create harmony in the world around them, by building rapport with people, creating a positive team atmosphere, looking after people?s welfare, motivating people and/or providing a service to the satisfaction of others. They value people?s contributions, seek to develop the role that others play, and invest a lot of effort in building positive relationships. They try to overcome differences of opinion and find ways in which the team can agree.
Coordinator
1. Recruits members to join the team.
2. Greets team members as they arrive.
3. Calls the meeting to order at the appointed start time.
4. During the meeting, controls the order of events.
5. Proposes Agenda topics and how much time should be devoted to each topic.
6. Concludes the meeting at the appointed ending time.
7. Clarifies the method for making decisions (consensus, voice vote, anonymous ballots, etc.) before discussions begin.
8. Creates and maintains team Project Plans (e.g., Gantt or flow charts).
9. Anticipates, seeks, and reserves support services needed by the team.
Arranges for refreshments food, travel, lodging, etc. for team members

Team Dynamics 7.4 of 10 on the basis of 2598 Review.