Social Structures and Class in Britain

Social Structures and Class in Britain
Peter lives in a traditional environment. He believes in the old values of no cohabitation, divorce and believes that families should stay together regardless. John lives in a modern environment and believes in progressive attitudes such as the option of divorce and cohabitation. Socialisation is learned behaviour. We learn our social status and structure through childhood into adulthood from our surrounding environment and input. From this we are presented with opinions to interpret, allowing us to form our own opinions which help us to mould our personalities. As we grow we learn to value beliefs individual to ourselves. From this we acquire an understanding between right and wrong. All this will lead to the structure of our own surrounding, who is in it and the group in which we feel appropriately suited and safe. John and Peter are close friends but their views clash. Peters strong believes sway him strongly to be in primary socialisation. Primary socialisation places the family as the first and most important factor.
Peter would have learnt this outlook from a child growing up in a secure stick together family environment, where believes are focused on maintaining the families wellbeing and security. It is possible judging by Peters views concerning families should stay together regardless, that he has grown within a strong religious community. Peter?s evident disapproval of divorce also indicates that peter has grown up surrounded by religion, possibly the Catholic Church. Religion is a powerful and highly influential institution of social control; it portrays strong and unconditional structures. People in society all find a group within they establish themselves and feel secure within, I strongly suspect that Peter and his family through influence are recognised and feel social control within the group of the church. Johns strong believes sway him strongly to be in secondary socialisation. Secondary socialisation places schools, the workplace and community as the first and most important factor. John would have observed this outlook growing up in a more open-minded modern environment. His beliefs will spread into further areas outside of the home and unlike Peter?s social status being most importantly the family John will feel within the group of the work place swaying him more to the community and open status. John I suspect has grown in an environment where family members are expected to be close and caring, but to recognise their responsibilities to each other as fathers and husbands, wives and mothers, parents and children plus also recognise between themselves they all share the tasks between them suitably of earning wages and making domestic arrangements necessary for its members to be fed, clothed, cleaned and generally looked after. Today society is a highly sophisticated set of relationships in which peoples behaviour is subject to countless influences and experiences. Norms and values are a representation of what is acceptable and unacceptable within society. Norms are a representation of acceptable behaviour for the given situation, and every situation can be different. For example, it would be unacceptable to attend a funeral in clothes suitable for a night club, plus talk rudely and loudly throughout the service, however it would be acceptable to attend a funeral in formal clothing and express your sympathy after the service in a quite caring and respectful manner. Values are theses guidelines in which people follow to present themselves accordingly and respectfully to society. With regard to human behaviour it understood that following these values at all times will ensure that society operates smoothly. social class What social class do people in our society fall into. For years this has been put into categories ?working class? ?middle class? ?upper class? and ?the underclass? These categories of classes have raised awareness over the years and placed people in quite prominent categories by society alone and their judgements. Whilst some people feel very proud to be recognised as a member of the working or middle class, others will use the terms openly as an insult referring to middle class attitudes as suggesting them to be snobbish people, or referring to working class as rough and the upper class are viewed upon as snooty and posh who live leisurely and uncomplicated lives. The underclass are seen as the threats to society who sponge of the state and their surroundings with now capabilities of putting anything positive into society plus having no willingness to work or better themselves. Social class is generally decided on the kind of job you do and the amount of money you earn. People?s jobs vary enormously. Some provide higher wages than others; others demand higher education, skills or training enabling much a higher position giving power and influence within society. Some jobs like doctor or manager within an industry allow the person to make decisions which affect the lives of other people. Other jobs like labourer or factory worker can be done by more or less anyone giving the person little if any power over anyone else. Depending which social class you fall into some jobs are much more secure than others. Most people in professional occupations like doctor, solicitor can be sure of a job for life. They have no need to worry about redundancy or firms closing down making them unemployed. Workers in manual jobs are much more vulnerable. When the industry and economy is doing well, they is plenty of work, but in times of economic crisis, the jobs of the shop floor workers in factories and those who are semi-skilled and unskilled are the first to be cut back to save money and protect profits. A middle class person is much more likely to live in a large expensive home if s/he is earning a good salary in a highly valued profession than if a working class person who is on a low income with periodic bouts of unemployment. Social status is not the same as social class but the two terms are closely linked. Status is more concerned with the way in which people are respected and valued in the minds of others. But value is still largely decided by the jobs people do and the ways in which different occupations are rated by society. In general professional?s skills are thought to be more important than manual skills even though society clearly depends on the contributions made by manual workers. It is certain that society needs its lorry drivers, factory workers, and dustmen just as much as it needs solicitors, doctors and business men, but the reality still suggests different occupations have different degrees of status a persons social class is mainly decided by the job he or she does. It would be nice in an ideal world if perhaps these different jobs would all be regarded as equally valuable to society.

Social Structures and Class in Britain 9.2 of 10 on the basis of 1246 Review.