Zinc

Zinc
Zinc, number 30 on the periodic table and a bluish-white metallic element, exists naturally in air, water and soil. It is present everywhere in the environment. All life on earth has evolved in the presence of zinc. Natural processes such as erosion, forest fires, aerosol formation above the seas and volcanic eruptions continuously transport Zinc. Zinc melts at about 420? C and boils at about 907? C. Zinc is efficient for plants. Zinc-deficient soils present in many parts of the world are a cause of low crop yields. Not only does it help plants but also the human body. It is responsible for the proper functioning of more than 300 enzymes in the human body, and is vital for the immune system. It will also fight against cold symptoms and reduce the length of a cold up to 7 days. Modern life is inconceivable without zinc. Zinc is the third most used nonferrous metal. The average person will use 730 pounds of zinc in his or her lifetime. Zinc?s principal use is to protect steel from corrosion. It can guarantee no rust for up to 12 years. Zinc is also used to purify water and power electric vehicles. It is used to make brass, automotive equipment and household appliances, fittings, tools and toys, in building and construction, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, and to produce rubber. Architects turn to zinc for its long, maintenance-free life and adaptability to various design styles ranging from traditional to modern. It is at the forefront of contemporary design. Zinc is also a major prospect to science and technology. Battery-powered laptops now can use a zinc-are battery, which provides more than 12 hours of usage on a single charge. That?s almost ten times the runtime of the original battery. The battery can also give cars enough power to reach speeds up to 120 mph. A high-purity alloy of zinc and copper is used in water purification. Zinc is also the key ingredient in a new hi-tech tape that is helping law enforcement officials around the world conduct safer and more reliable undercover work. Consuming more than 40,000 tons annually, the toy market is also an important user of zinc.
Zinc is very helpful to the environment in many ways. It helps save energy. By prolonging the life and durability of steel, zinc helps save vast amounts of energy that would otherwise be required to frequently replace corroded steel structures and manufactured goods. Zinc is completely recyclable without any loss of its physical or chemical properties. Eighty percent of all the zinc used it recycled sooner or later. Much of the zinc produced in the past is still in use, which will be good for future generations to come.
Zinc also has many medical uses. It is essential for healthy skin. As a drying agent and astringent, zinc oxide has been used for generations to soothe diaper rash and relieve itching. Zinc is a natural sunscreen, which protects chapped lips and skin from the sun?s harmful rays. Zinc sulfate is effective in treating some cases of acne. A water-based solution of zinc sulfate helps cold sores. Zinc also soothes skin from such things as poison ivy, sunburn, blisters and gum disease. It is even a natural insect repellent. Not only does zinc help skin but also boosts brain activity. Research has shown that women deficient in zinc had a harder time on standard memory tests. It also is imperative for proper learning, and task and behavioral performance in children. Zinc interacts with other chemicals to send messages to the sensory brain center, enhancing memory and thinking skills. Zinc deprivation causes poor growth and maturation of the cerebellum and impairs the development of brain cells, which may contribute to learning disorder or emotional and behavior problems.

Zinc 9.7 of 10 on the basis of 2712 Review.