Banning Fox Hunting

Banning Fox Hunting
I have studied Fox hunting, and I agree wholeheartedly with this statement. I have heard interviews with hunt supporters in which they say that fox hunting does a huge job for farmers in keeping fox numbers down. I cannot believe that this is true, and having researched it on the internet I have found that at least 2 scientific studies have concluded that statistically the numbers of foxes killed by hunts is insignificant. I appreciate that killing the fox and keeping numbers down is not the only reason that hunts take place, but it is often used as an excuse for the purpose of fox hunting; hence hunt supporters appear to contradict themselves in their response to individual questions on why they hunt and group responses to political criticism or pressure from animal rights groups. In my research on fox hunting I have discovered that a fox hunt of some sort takes place in a number of European countries, America, Canada, Russia and elsewhere. I found these statements on the Masters of Foxhounds Association of America (mfaa) website
?In Britain the goal is to kill the fox. Because there is no rabies in the British Isles, populations of fox are extremely high and fox are considered vermin." ?Farmers with sheep farms want the animal numbers controlled. In America this is not normally the case. A successful hunt ends when the fox is accounted for by entering a hole in the ground, called an earth. Once there, hounds are rewarded with praise from their huntsman. The fox gets away and is chased another day." The MFAA?s Code of Hunting Practices does not rule out killing the quarry ? but does not allow digging out of an animal once it has gone to ground. Because of Northern America?s ?more sporting? approach to hunting with hounds, there is much less organized opposition to the sport. International Fund for Animal Welfare (ifaw)?s Cindy Milburn said: "I have heard fox hunters in the usa boast that they haven?t actually caught a fox for years." I am not opposed to people enjoying an age-old tradition, but the fact that it involves (however it is described by hunt supporters) the brutal killing of an animal that in actual fact eats often diseased animals such as rats, thus helping the farmer, seems to me to be a waste of time aside from an animal welfare issue. ?Hunting with dogs does nothing to reduce the fox population, a recent scientific study concludes, contradicting a cherished belief of farmers and foxhunters. Hunting supporters, who are fighting to stop the government banning the centuries-old pastime, say the research - funded by animal welfare groups ? is flawed." have looked at the argument from the point of view of pro-hunters, but from everything I have seen of them it seems like they have something they are trying to hide ? they are vague with their explanations of why they enjoy the sport, they give reasons to hunt which are inaccurate, and they fiercely deny that they don?t go just to kill animals, when actually the whole point of the hunt is to do so - do they buy expensive uniforms and keep packs of foxhounds just so they can run around fields? Religion, be it Christianity or Islam or a large number of others, takes a stance on animal rights, however there are divisions within these religions and so it is hard to determine the exact position the religion takes on the issue. The following are quotes or general attitudes from various Christian sources: ?God has created a ?good? world. Therefore, we should leave it as it is, and not take animals out of their natural environment or treat them badly." ?God is father and we are his children? Animals are part of God?s family." - Simon Phipps, former Bishop of London ?It is no sin to beat a dog to death? - The Archbishop of Udine, Italy ?Blessed are the meek? - Jesus These quotes show pretty much a full spectrum of Christian views on animal rights. To me it suggests that in a matter like hunting you cannot rely on religion for guidance on the issue.

Banning Fox Hunting 9.7 of 10 on the basis of 1131 Review.