Tourism in The Isle of Purbeck

Tourism in The Isle of Purbeck
Tourism does more harm than good in The Isle of Purbeck Of Purbeck. Tourism should not be promoted or encouraged. where IS IT? ==== Swanage is in the Isle of Purbeck, Dorset. The Isle of Purbeck is known to many different kinds of facilities to suit everyone?s needs, one of the most populist features that The Isle of Purbeck has to offer is the award winning beaches. Because of the various types of attractions The Isle of Purbeck has to offer, it is known as a ?honeypot site?
During our year 10 visit to The Isle of Purbeck we found out that it is well known for the unique geology of the landforms, which is another attraction for tourists. We investigated in further depth the following sites: The Blue Pool Old Harry Rocks Studland Bay -????- Lulworth Cove [image] In the next several pages I will explain the geology of The Isle of Purbeck itself and will explain the geology of the other landforms we visited whilst on our visit. Also in the next couple of pages I will explain the impact of tourism of each site The Geology Of The Isle Of Purbeck The diagram of the geology of The Isle of Purbeck The above diagram shows how the bays and headlands have been formed due to the different types of rocks. In the diagram you can see the tertiary sands, clay rocks and wealden clay rocks are the less resistant rocks and the Portland and Purbeck limestone is the resistant rock. Therefore when the waves hit the coast the resistant rocks; tertiary sands, clay rocks and wealden clay rocks will not erode, whereas the less resistant ones will, as they are more softer and are not as hard and strong enough like the others. Which rocks make up The Isle of Purbeck? ? Portland limestone ? Chalk ? Wealden clay & sands ? Gault & Greensand ? Bagshot beds ? Kimmeridge clay ? Purbeck limestone ? London clay & reading beds Diagram 1 Diagram 2 The diagrams above show the formations of headland and bays, which form along the coastline. Where the area is known to have either resistant or less resistant rock. The diagrams show how the waves erode the rock to eventually form bays. The resistant rock cannot be worn away as fast therefore headlands are left protruding in the sea. Old Harry Rocks Before The Old Harry Rocks were formed, the foreland was protruding into the sea, which meant that the sea in time wore away the rocks. As the sea attacked the weak points of the rocks i.e. the cracks it created small caves. Eventually these caves started to erode all the way through leaving natural looking arches. Gradually these arches started to become weak and also eroded leaving stacks from the collapsed roofs of the arches. . The Geology: 1. The sea firstly attacks the weak points in the foreland and creates caves 2. The caves begin to erode all the way through forming natural arches 3. The roofs of the arches begin to collapse due to the constant wave action, and go on to form stacks Annotated picture of Old Harry Rocks the one from the work pack Studland Bay A natural process formed Studland Bay; this was due to the waves crashing against the coastline. Due to this constant wave action gradually the coastline begun to wear away, therefore the coastline recede. It is said that if nothing is done to avoid this situation then the coastline will carry on reacting. The growth of Studland Bay: 1600 1721 1849 1947 The above diagrams explains how the prevailing winds pick up the sand and carry it around, as it is dropped a sand dune is formed. As a result of this process the geology of Studland Bay is subjugated by sand dunes. key - Of the above diagrams in the work pack key - Studland Bay is a place that has something to offer everyone that has many features to satisfy everyone. Studland Bay offers several areas to eat, toilet facilities and offers restricted areas for swimming and water sports. Due to this many different kinds of people are attracted to this site, this includes tourists and locals. However due to the huge demand to visit this particular site, conflicts between what everyone wishes to do occurs, within the Bay. The Blue Pool The Blue Pool is a result of human activity. As it was once a clay mine, gradually the demand for clay decreased and therefore that meant so did the clay mine. After the clay mine was no longer in use, this meant that in the centre a large empty crater was left in the woodland area. As time progressed the empty crater started to fill with rainwater, and started to look like a lake. This lake started to attract tourists due to the amazing colour feature caused by light diffracting from particles of clay. The Geology: key Facts and Figures: 50,000 Visitors per year The Blue Pool has various types of facilities to offer everyone apart from the view of the pool itself. It offers toilets facilities, a teahouse, a children?s play area, a large car park, a plant centre and a viewpoint. Due to the facilities available at the site different types of people are attracted to the site, this includes dog walkers, the elderly, and those who just want to relax. A map of Blue Pool Label with features The number of people recorded in 10 minutes Old Harry Rocks- Studland Bay- Blue Pool- [image] [image] I think that the 3 sites have different sort of thing to offer for the tourists. Each site may hold a value for different types of tourists, for example a family may go to Studland Bay to enjoy the sun, but other tourists such as geologists may go there to study land formation. I believe more people go to Studland Bay because of the beautiful beaches; many families go there as well as other tourists. Blue pool is a beautiful, quiet, tranquil place. Families with small toddlers are less likely to go there because it does not suit the small children. Mainly couples and older people go there to relax. Also it is based in a natural environment, so it is a place to observe nature. Old Harry Rocks has a variety of tourists going there; some people go to admire the beauty and some to observe the geological value of this site. Positive impacts Below are 3 sites I have chosen to look further into. Using these 3 sites I am going to state the positive features of the site, using my own viewpoint and from the view score I carried during my visit to each site. Old Harry Rocks: Greenland with a path allows site seeing [image] Cars are not a disturbance [image] Litter is not a problem [image] The geology of the rocks provides education for students [image] Studland Bay: The redistricted water sports area provides the tourists with the appropriate water sports needs [image] A wide range of winter birds are able to be seen i.e. geese, there is also a chance to see sand lizards [image] Cars are not causing any kind of disturbance Blue Pool: [image] Cannot see evidence of footpath erosion [image] Allows those who enjoy wildlife to admire the rare green sand lizards and dragonflies [image] Tourist facilities blend in well. Also some facilities like the coffee shop provide jobs for the locals [image] [image] [image] [image] The Blue Pool itself provides scenery and relaxation for the tourists and also provides education for the students about the geology Fences are put up around the pool therefore protection is a vital aspect There is no evidence of tourists damaging the landform in any way I listed all the positive impacts for the 3 sites that were shown. The main positive effect of all the sites it that they hold educational value and they always will. The only other reason people go there is to see what the site has to offer. In conclusion I believe that tourism does not do more harm then good within the Isle of Purbeck. As long as tourists do not interfere with the natural process the sites are going through, we will have these sites to learn from in future. Negative impacts Below are 3 sites I have chosen to look further into. Using these 3 sites I am going to state the negative features of the site, using my own viewpoint and from the view score I carried during my visit to each site. Old Harry Rocks: A lack of basic facilities [image] Education at the site itself is not a huge priority as there is no evidence of relevant information i.e. information boards [image] Studland Bay: There may be some kind of erosion on the footpaths [image] The noise may cause noise pollution [image] Litter may be an issue if tourists do not respect the sight [image] Litter may be a negative aspect if tourists do not sustain it well enough Blue Pool: [image] There may be an impact on the wildlife in the area if it is not looked after or maintained well by tourists [image] Slight erosion on footpaths [image] I listed all the negative impacts for the 3 sites that were shown. The main negative impact is human interference. This cannot be helped because to learn from these natural sites we are going to have to interfere. By looking at the negative effects I feel that Tourism does more harm than good in The Isle of Purbeck. Tourism should not be promoted or encouraged. My development plan Old Harry Rocks Conclusion and Evaluation After studying each site in great detail and referring to my hypothesis I believe that tourism should not be encouraged. If the Isle of Purbeck came up with a way that people could view and study the landforms without damaging them or interfering with them, then I believe tourism should be encouraged. By having a sustainable development programme people can learn and not damage anything by doing that. For my development plan I chose Old Harry Rocks because I thought this is the most dangerous and interesting site. I felt that I could help make Old Harry Rocks a safer place then it is now. So many things can be done to change the way this site is. Below is a list of the thing I would combine on Old Harry Rocks to improve its features. Ø Install a small fencing to provide a barrier of safety. I decided to put in the fences to provide safety for the tourists. For example if a small toddler went on Old Harry Rocks he is more likely to wonder near the edge then adults. The fence would stop them from falling. In addition the fence would be made of wood so it doesn?t ruin the landform. Ø Place 3-4 telescopes to view the scenery. If the telescopes where there they would allow people to view the scenery and see the landscape. Ø A couple of coastguards patrolling the area. They are there for the tourists? safety. If someone has an accident the coastguard will be around, so help comes faster. Ø Place information boards so people read and learn. While tourists are walking around they can look at the information board and understand why the Old Harry Rocks look like what they are. Ø A signpost to say that there is a large sheer cliff. This is there just to warn the tourists, so they don?t get too close to the edge. Ø Put benches where people can safely sit and rest. If anyone needs to sit down and relax to get their breath back, there would be many benches to sit on. Again the benches are made of wood so they don?t ruin the landform. Ø Put litter bins where more people stand. This will help prevent litter being thrown on the ground. Old Harry Rocks would be a lot cleaner. Ø A small hut which provides refreshments, which has a couple of more bins near it. If people want a bottle of water they can purchase it from the hut. This does increase the chance of litter, but there will be plenty of bins provided to dispose of the litter.

Tourism in The Isle of Purbeck 7.5 of 10 on the basis of 2546 Review.