The Shabbat's Effect on a Life of a Jew

The Shabbat's Effect on a Life of a Jew
Observing Shabbat every week reinforces the obedience and discipline of Jews because they are following 39 of the 613 mitzvot that apply to Shabbat. As they are resting physically they can reflect on how God intended life to be. Shabbat may also act as a break from the monotony of everyday life for some Jews. As with any festival, Shabbat unifies the family. The ways in which Shabbat might affect a young Jew are very different from the ways adults may be affected. While adults are more likely to appreciate a rest by Saturday, teenagers may want to go out with friends.
The mitzvot prevent Jews from going to, for example, a party on a Friday night. They would also be forbidden to go shopping on Saturday. They would be unable to join clubs that meet on a Saturday. This could mean that they find it harder to socialise and spend time with friends at weekends. It would also be a lot harder for them to get a weekend job where they would only work on Sunday. If they couldn?t find an employer willing to do this, they might not have the extra money that their peers might and they would have less of an opportunity to experience employment before they leave school. In the winter, when the sun sets much earlier, children may have to leave school early so they are at home in time to prepare to see Shabbat in. This could mean that they were unable to join sports clubs like hockey or netball that often practise after school in the winter. If a Jewish child went on a school trip, they might have to make special arrangements so that they were following the mitzvot on Shabbat, which would be especially difficult if the child did not go to a Jewish school or they may not be allowed to go at all. Jewish children would not be able to do their homework on Shabbat as they are not allowed to write. This means that they would probably have to do it on Sunday, and would not be able to go out with friends even then. With their life so influenced by the mitzvot, it is likely that young Jewish people would feel resentment towards their religion at times. Although it is thought by Jews to be an honour, the fact that they are a chosen race and clearly separate from other religions may be difficult for young Jews as many teenagers just want to be like everyone else. Orthodox and Liberal Jews differ in the way they follow the Shabbat restrictions. While Orthodox Jews will follow the mitzvot literally and very strictly (although scripture states that the mitzvot should never prevent a life being saved), Liberal Jews have a more relaxed approach and think that the mitzvot should change as society alters. The laws mean that Jews lives are affected in many small ways, positive and negative. As sifting, kneading, baking and combining raw materials are all forbidden, twice as much food must be prepared on a Friday before sunset so that there is enough food for Shabbat as well as that day. Jews would not be allowed to drive on Shabbat as they are operating machinery and this is forbidden. This could have both a positive and a negative effect. Not being allowed to drive would mean that Jews may be encouraged to walk and exercise, but if they lived a long way from the synagogue this could make Shabbat difficult, especially if they had to make several journeys to and from the synagogue that day. Some Shabbat restrictions don?t cause real problems but can be an inconvenience. The Shabbat restriction that states that sewing is not allowed would mean that if, for example a button fell off a piece of clothing, Jews wouldn?t be allowed to sew it back on. As tying or untying a knot is forbidden, Jews would have to wear shoes without laces. No bags could be carried to the synagogue because carrying items from a private place to a public place (and vice versa) is not allowed. Writing is also banned on Shabbat, so if, for example, someone told a Jew something important to remember, they wouldn?t be able to note it down. Although these Shabbat laws only cause inconvenience, having to account for them for one day of each week could become tiresome. Keeping the Sabbath will affect Jews in more general ways as well. For example, in a typical Jewish household where the husband has a full time job, he will need an employer who will allow him to leave work early enough in winter to see in the Shabbat. In a Orthodox Jewish household, the mother will prepare for the Shabbat by cooking and generally preparing so she will have to be very organised. Jewish parents will have to be very strict with their children so that they will fully understand the importance of the festival. For example, they cannot allow their children to go out at all on a Friday night like many other children might. If parents are to ensure that their children follow the Shabbat restrictions they must be self-disciplined so that they set a good example. Orthodox Jews are likely to be affected more by Shabbat than Liberal Jews because they follow the Sabbath restrictions so much more closely. Liberal teenagers may be less likely than Orthodox teenagers to feel resentment towards their religion or to their parents for enforcing the rules because these Shabbat laws do not affect their life so greatly.

The Shabbat's Effect on a Life of a Jew 9.3 of 10 on the basis of 2346 Review.