The Effects of the Blitz on Everyday Life in Britain

The Effects of the Blitz on Everyday Life in Britain
For the first time in modern days war had literally come home. All over cites in Europe, as the Nazis advanced, the Luftwaffe spread its wings and flew only ever intending to cause terror on the land below. France was taken, now even the far edges of Britain were in reach of the German bombers. No one was safe, so the government warned people in cities and implemented certain regulations to make people as safe as possible and reduce the chance of getting bombed by the Luftwaffe. Britain was prepared for the worst. But no one was prepared for the full and devastating effects of The Blitz. From the beginning of the war a regulation that was imposed across cities throughout the UK, was The Blackout that was part of the arp regulations, which intended to hinder the German bombers in the air. Houses, businesses and all buildings had to cover their windows so as to not allow any light to be shown. This caused claustrophobia in the dark homes but a far worst problem was the fact that there were no lights in open areas. So there were no streetlights, no crossing lights and all vehicles travelled with one dimmed light, which was facing downward.
Due to all these safety precautions there was a large number of people who sustained broken bones from mishaps in the dark as well as many people who had major injuries caused by serious traffic accidents. Although once the Germans started using incendiary bombs The Blackout became far less effective. The Blitz did not only lower the morale of the British people by destroying their homes, flattening their streets and separating families but the effects of the bombing caused major disruption to everyday life. Civilians who returned to the surface, from the air raid shelters and underground, after the nightly bombings found heaps of rubble from the buildings that were hit and smoke which rised from the fires that burnt through the city. People carried on their daily routine as normally as they could whilst the roads were being opened up and buildings repaired. Another effect that The Blitz had on everyday life in Britain was that large numbers of people had to flee to The Underground, air raid shelters and a few to their Anderson shelters to escape the bombs and fires above. Civilians spent long hours, night after night in small, confined spaces. Although not all people went underground during the bombings, the task of tackling the effects of the bombing fell on the emergency services, which were backed up by volunteers. The Air-raid wardens helped check the arp regulations before The Blitz and also aided the emergency services during The Blitz. Immediately once Britain had declared war on Germany the British government implemented rationing. From the 1940?s food started to be rationed because the Germans were attacking the ships that imported most of the countries supplies, therefore less food was circulating around Britain and the government had to ensure that everyone was able to survive. Civilians were also encouraged to grow their own food. During 1941, The Blitz forced the government to begin rationing clothes as well so as to not waste energy on unnecessary luxuries. The Blitz brought home all the effects of war and it came in full force. People?s lives all over Britain were put on hold; only one thing was important, stay alive and help win the war. Civilians found a total and drastic change in their lives brought along by The Blitz, which caused death, destruction and chaos in cities all over. Everyone thought they had suffered the worst, and for once they were right.

The Effects of the Blitz on Everyday Life in Britain 7.2 of 10 on the basis of 1928 Review.