The Black Death: One of the Most Disastrous Events of the Medieval Period

The Black Death: One of the Most Disastrous Events of the Medieval Period
The Bubonic Plague or The Black Death was one of the most disastrous events of the medieval period. This disease usually causes swelling of the lymph glands, called buboes, from which bubonic plague is named. Between 25 ? 30 million Europeans died over four years (1347 ? 1351).

The Black Death was caused by it being transmitted to human beings chiefly by fleas from infected rats. The Black Death affected medieval society in a number of ways.
Firstly, it affected Asia and travelled to Europe by rat-infested Italian ships trading goods across the Mediterranean Sea. The Black Plague reached England by 1348, and by 1351 it had killed over a million people, one-third of Europe?s entire population was killed.

Secondly, it had a devastating effect on a person?s leg or arm from a rat infested flea bite that would swell up into painful bulging buboes. More painful buboes would appear all over the person?s body until the infection was so bad.

The buboes were spots of blood which turned black underneath the skin. An attack of the bubonic plague does not last long, but the disease has a very high death rate.

An attack of plague usually begins suddenly. The person has chills and fever, headache, and body pains. At the same time, the lymph glands swell, especially in the neck, and armpits. Often the buboes become open sores.

The Black Plague finally resulted in killing millions of people through Europe, Russia, Persia, India, Norway, Asia and Africa. Also they stoped the plague by the British Government made quarantine and campaigns to exterminate in infected rats.

The cause of the Black Death was the fleas in the rats and the humans and also how they spread it through the countries by boat and the infected rats went into the countries and bit the people.

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