The Downwinders

The Downwinders
By 1970 everyone on the planet had plutonium and strontium in their bodies, and their genes had been scrambled like those of Luning?s mice. But just as the test ban of 1963 stopped the weapons fallout, a new source of planetary contamination began: the nuclear fuel cycle. The accidents at Windscale in Cumbria (now Sellafield) and at Kyshtym in the Soviet Union had added to the fallout and given a taste of things to come. Full-scale government-licensed releases into the biosphere from nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants took over in the 1970s from bombs as the source of radiation exposure to the world population. Their health effects soon became clear. By the early 1980s, Sellafield had become synonymous with childhood leukaemia, and by 1995 all the other main nuclear pollution sources in Europe ? Dounreay, La Hague, Aldermaston and Harwell ? had their studies showing cancer and/or leukaemia increases. The figure for Dounreay is eight times, for La Hague in France, 15 times.
The supposedly independent government Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (comare) reported that radiation cannot be the cause because the doses are too low. Despite the reassurances of learned committees, the ?Sellafield Blight? has now extended from Seascale (where the leukaemia cluster was reported by Yorkshire Television) to the estuaries and sandy shores of Wales (where our findings of increased risk of cancer near the North Wales coast were also reported by TV in February of this year). This coastal effect was found in north-west England by researchers from Lancaster University in 1987, and for estuaries on the west coast of England by LeThe ?Downwinders? By 1970 everyone on the planet had plutonium and strontium in their bodies, and their genes had been scrambled like those of Luning?s mice. But just as the test ban of 1963 stopped the weapons fallout, a new source of planetary contamination began: the nuclear fuel cycle. The accidents at Windscale in Cumbria (now Sellafield) and at Kyshtym in the Soviet Union had added to the fallout and given a taste of things to come. Full-scale government-licensed releases into the biosphere from nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants took over in the 1970s from bombs as the source of radiation exposure to the world population. Their health effects soon became clear. By the early 1980s, Sellafield had become synonymous with childhood leukaemia, and by 1995 all the other main nuclear pollution sources in Europe ? Dounreay, La Hague, Aldermaston and Harwell ? had their studies showing cancer and/or leukaemia increases. The figure for Dounreay is eight times, for La Hague in France, 15 times. The supposedly independent government Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (comare) reported that radiation cannot be the cause because the doses are too low. Despite the reassurances of learned committees, the ?Sellafield Blight? has now extended from Seascale (where the leukaemia cluster was reported by Yorkshire Television) to the estuaries and sandy shores of Wales (where our findings of increased risk of cancer near the North Wales coast were also reported by TV in February of this year). This coastal effect was found in north-west England by researchers from Lancaster University in 1987, and for estuaries on the west coast of England by Leukaemia Research Fund researchers in 1990. The concerns of the people of Ireland over Sellafield and the IriThe ?Downwinders? By 1970 everyone on the planet had plutonium and strontium in their bodies, and their genes had been scrambled like those of Luning?s mice. But just as the test ban of 1963 stopped the weapons fallout, a new source of planetary contamination began: the nuclear fuel cycle. The accidents at Windscale in Cumbria (now Sellafield) and at Kyshtym in the Soviet Union had added to the fallout and given a taste of things to come. Full-scale government-licensed releases into the biosphere from nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants took over in the 1970s from bombs as the source of radiation exposure to the world population. Their health effects soon became clear. By the early 1980s, Sellafield had become synonymous with childhood leukaemia, and by 1995 all the other main nuclear pollution sources in Europe ? Dounreay, La Hague, Aldermaston and Harwell ? had their studies showing cancer and/or leukaemia increases. The figure for Dounreay is eight times, for La Hague in France, 15 times. The supposedly independent government Committee on Medical Aspects of Radiation in the Environment (comare) reported that radiation cannot be the cause because the doses are too low. Despite the reassurances of learned committees, the ?Sellafield Blight? has now extended from Seascale (where the leukaemia cluster was reported by Yorkshire Television) to the estuaries and sandy shores of Wales (where our findings of increased risk of cancer near the North Wales coast were also reported by TV in February of this year). This coastal effect was found in north-west England by researchers from Lancaster University in 1987, and for estuaries on the west coast of England by Leukaemia Research Fund researchers in 1990. The concerns of the people of Ireland over Sellafield and the Irish Sea have now become translated into a court case against bnfl. sh Sea have now become translated into a court case against bnfl. ukaemia Research Fund researchers in 1990. The concerns of the people of Ireland over Sellafield and the Irish Sea have now become translated into a court case against bnfl.

The Downwinders 8 of 10 on the basis of 1211 Review.