Euphoria: Glengarry Glen Ross

Euphoria: Glengarry Glen Ross
Glengarry Glen Ross is a movie based on the award winning play by David Mamet dealing with the corrupt world of real estate salesmen in hot pursuit of closing their next big deal in hopes of obtaining the American Dream. The desire for the next big lead or prospect as it is called in the real estate world causes the salesman to act out in a foolish and oftentimes violent manner. The behavior the salesmen demonstrate when a lead is unavailable can be compared to a crack head experiencing withdrawal symptoms. Both will deviate from what is socially acceptable behavior and become violent with actions or words, harm others or their property and cause them and others stress related illnesses.
Salesmen are put under tremendous amounts of stress by their bosses on a daily basis. The 3M meetings or ?morning motivational meetings,? are designed to keep the salespeople alert, on their toes and ready to control the mind of any hot leads they might obtain that day. An example of this in the movie is when Dave Moss states, ??I?ve got 48 hours to make a lot of money,?? (Glengarry Glen Ross). You can almost feel the tension oozing from the desperate man?s voice as he speaks these words. This type of ultimatum will in effect cause the person to become anxious and panicked as they attempt to meet the deadline their boss has placed on them.
Psychological mind control is a way the bosses motivate their salespeople and this mind control has a trickle down effect. The salespeople then use the mind control technique they learn from their bosses on their clients as well. In the movie, Shelley Levine aka ?The Machine,? illustrates the technique on a prospect: ??You gotta? believe in yourself?If you see the opportunity then take it? this is the now and this is that dream?? (Glengarry Glen Ross). Shelley Levine then proceeds to tell his client ??Now I want you to sign?I sat for five minutes then I sat for twenty two minutes watching the clock on the wall? I locked in on them and they finally signed?? (Glengarry Glen Ross). This hypnotic effect of mind control is hard to master; however, once the defense barriers are broken one can close many deals.
After many disappointing cold calls, meetings and drop bys one of the salesmen, Dave Moss, has an idea that he feels is sure to be the solution to all their troubles with the bad leads. ??It?s (the robbery) is a big decision and a big reward for one nights work?? (Glengarry Glen Ross). George Aaronnow, another salesman on the skids, is astounded by Dave Moss?s plan. To confirm that he understood Dave correctly he asks: ??Are you gonna? steal the leads and sell them to Graph??? (Glengarry Glen Ross). Dave is obviously desperate and will go to extreme measures, such as trashing the office to get the Glengarry hot leads; he is like a crack head in a coke factory.
Shelley Levine is used to being the top dog in sales, but like everyone else he is in a slump and blames the bad leads. ??I need those leads and I need?em now or I?m out.??(Glengarry Glen Ross). John Williamson, the office manager, gave Shelley a lead just to keep him occupied for a while; however, the lead was old and useless. Upon learning about the lead Shelley loses his cool and screams: ??You fucked a good man out of six thousand dollars!?? (Glengarry Glen Ross). Shelley?s status on the blackboard is diminished and his daughter?s condition has worsened. These factors have caused Shelley to suffer from a ?crash,? a form of withdrawal that crack heads experience, which includes depression, irritability and fatigue.
The real estate and mortgage industries are a tough industry in which to make a living. Sexual harassment, drug usage and embezzlement are common in the office place. Closing on a lead produces the same euphoria or ?high? feeling as cocaine being pumped to the brain, consequently, that is what keeps most men and women alike in the incredibly stressful job that requires one to ??Always be closing.??(Glengarry Glen Ross).

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