The Contribution of the Battle of the Somme to the Allied Victory in the First World War

The Contribution of the Battle of the Somme to the Allied Victory in the First World War
The conclusion to the First World War was the armistice in 1918. The allies were victorious. The question that needs to be asked is if, how and to what an extent the Battle of the Somme in 1916 contributed and helped this victory. The popular view is that the Somme may have hindered the allies in their quest for victory and that in no way was the Somme a major factor in the allied victory. However, it can be argued that the Somme was an integral and crucial part leading up to the armistice in 1918. It can be argued that the Somme was an indirect cause of the allied victory. The combined pressures of the Somme, Verdun and the War at Sea (the blockade and naval war) lead to desperation manoeuvres by the Germans, such as the Spring Offensive and more importantly ?Unrestricted U-boat warfare. After the Somme, they had concluded that they could not win the war on the Western Front. This decision had severe implications on Germany. There was the potential now for attacks to be launched on U.S. ships, causing a loss in American lives.
Germany must have known that a threat on American lives could bring America into the war. This illustrates the desperation of the Germans as a result of the Somme. As the Germans feared, this was the significant factor into American entry into the war. This had a enormous psychological effect on Germany. America had the potential for an army far greater than any other. They had to concede defeat. The Somme was instrumental in this chain of events that led to the German defeat. A crucial point in the war on the Western Front after the Somme is that the German and British armies had greatly changed during the course of the Somme. "â?? the German Army suffered in the Somme battles to such an extent thatâ?? it was never again the effective fighting machine of early 1916."1 Whereas a previously amateur British army was now ?â?? a military machine the equal of any on earth.?1 The Somme can be seen as a turning point in the war on the Western Front. "â??the Germans really faced the beginning of the end."2 The German army was also weaker in other ways. The Somme had a deep psychological effect on the Germans, lowering their morale. It was obvious that the Germans were on the brink of defeat. "We must save the men from a second Somme battle" Ludendorff said. Their own commander accepted how great an affect the Somme had on the Germans. The statement also suggests how another battle like this would have been a knockout blow. So it seems that the Somme was important leading up to the allied victory. It played a role in many ways, bringing the allies closer to victory. It can be concluded that it definitely contributed to the allied victory in the First World War. Perhaps it is true that "â??it is difficult to avoid the conclusion that the Somme was an essential precondition to success in the last two years of the war."1 However it seems more likely that it may not have been as instrumental as the British superiority at sea, but the Somme definitely helped, cumulatively with other factors, to deliver the knockout blow in 1918

The Contribution of the Battle of the Somme to the Allied Victory in the First World War 8.9 of 10 on the basis of 3298 Review.