Exhaust EmissionsTask 3 P4Petrol and diesel engines work in slightly

Exhaust EmissionsTask 3 P4Petrol and diesel engines work in slightly
Exhaust EmissionsTask 3 P4Petrol and diesel engines work in slightly
different ways and burn different fuels, so they produce different exhausts

Petrol and diesel engines work in slightly different ways and burn
different fuels, so they produce different exhausts. Compared with
petrol engines, diesel engines produce smaller amounts of unburnt and
partially burnt fuel but can produce more nitrogen oxides and large
amounts of smoke. These particles consist of soot, hydrocarbons,
sulphur-based chemicals and volatile organic compounds.
Heavy duty diesel vehicles, such as trucks, can be very polluting
because they produce large amounts of particulates and nitrogen
oxides. Diesel exhaust has also been shown to be a probable cause of
cancer.

what are diesel engine exhaust emissions?

Cold Start Emissions ? Starting and driving a vehicle the first few
minute?s results in higher emissions because the emissions control
equipment has not yet reached its optimal operating temperature.

Running Emissions ? Pollutants are emitted from the vehicle?s exhaust
during driving and idling after the vehicle is warmed up.

Diesel engine exhaust emissions are a mixture of gases, vapors, liquid
aerosols and substances made up of particles. They contain the
products of combustion including:

carbon
nitrogen
water
carbon monoxide
aldehydes
nitrogen dioxide
sulphur dioxide
Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons
The carbon particle or soot content varies from 60% to 80% depending
on the fuel used and the type of engine. Most of the contaminants are
adsorbed onto the soot. Petrol engines produce more carbon monoxide
but much less soot than diesel engines.

what factors affect the composition OF diesel fumes?

the quality of diesel fuel used;
the type of engine, e.g. standard, turbo or injector;
the state of engine tuning;
the fuel pump setting;
the workload demand on the engine;
the engine temperature;
Whether the engine has been regularly maintained.
what does the colour OF the smoke produced indicate?
Smoke is the product of combustion. Vehicles at a workplace may
produce three kinds of smoke, two of which indicate engine problems.
The three types are:

Blue smoke (mainly oil and unburnt fuel). This indicates that the
vehicle has been poorly serviced and/or a tuned engine
Black smoke (soot, oil and unburnt fuel). This indicates there is
a mechanical fault with the engine
White smoke (water droplets and unburnt fuel) which is produced
when the engine is started from cold and disappears when the
engine warms up
Exhaust fumes are just one of the ways CO2 adds to climate change

Not only do vehicles cause localised air pollution, they are also
responsible for a large proportion of greenhouse gas emissions.
Vehicles are responsible for about 25 per cent of the total greenhouse
gas emissions through emissions of carbon dioxide. Nitrogen oxides,
volatile organic compounds and ozone in the lower atmosphere also add
to the greenhouse effect, although they are not the major greenhouse
gases.

Petrol cars emit about 2.3kg of carbon dioxide per litre of fuel
burned.

In a petrol engine many faults can increase contaminants in the
exhaust, for example:

a rich idle mixture or incorrect air/fuel ratios
a dirty air filter
an incorrectly adjusted carburetor
faulty spark plugs or worn distributor contacts
a faulty ignition coil
improper timing
vacuum leaks, burned valves, worn rings and head gasket leaks

Exhaust EmissionsTask 3 P4Petrol and diesel engines work in slightly 7.8 of 10 on the basis of 3479 Review.