Separation of Church and State

Separation of Church and State
The situation at the Alabama Supreme Court regarding the Ten Commandments monument has gotten far out of hand. Chief Justice Roy Moore had no right to display a two and a half ton monument exhibiting the Ten Commandments in front of a judicial building; especially after the federal appeals court ordered him to remove it. The U.S. Constitution calls for a separation of church and state, which Chief Justice Moore blatantly ignored in order to erect this gigantic sculpture of the Ten Commandments in the courthouse?s rotunda. This statue has rightfully been taken away and I believe that the statue should never have been there in the first place. Many know that the Ten Commandments are taken from the Old Testament of the Bible, which obviously represents Judeo-Christian partiality. This statue specifically promotes the Jewish and Christian religions and since it was displayed at an Alabama judicial building, it links these particular theologies with the state. The Establishment Clause and the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution guarantee the respect of an established religion and the protection from the prohibition of religious free exercise.
The case regarding the public display of the Ten Commandments comes into question under the Establishment Clause, which has a three-part test developed in the 1971 case Lemon v Kurtzman to assist in deciding cases such as this one. The test allows for governmental action if the case involves a non-secular purpose, has a primary effect that either advances or inhibits religion and is the cause of governmental entanglement with religion. The courts easily decided that the situation in Alabama fails the test and declared it unconstitutional because the monument advances the beliefs of Judaism and Christianity. I also contemplate Judge Moore?s belief that his big project should be sponsored by the taxpayers? money. It does not make sense that a diverse group of people who all do not share the same religious beliefs are required to have some of their tax money go towards a project that specifically highlights the Jewish and Christian religions. This action taken by Chief Justice Moore exemplifies his preference of religions, which implies that he believes and the state of Alabama believes other religions to be inferior because of the rules such as ?Do not bow down or serve any other God? within the Ten Commandments. This statement made by the presence of the monument at a courthouse is an extremely dangerous one because the impact that it could have on different faith communities who are forced to encounter this statue. I cannot understand why Judge Moore believes that these rules should be funded by the thousands of taxpayers who do believe in gods other than the one of Judeo-Christian faith. When Judge Roy Moore decided to sneak his two and a half ton Ten Commandments monument into the rotunda in front of Alabama?s Supreme Court, I think that he was just asking for trouble. Any logical person could have seen the dilemmas that placing an enormous exhibit of your personal faith beliefs at a judicial building would provoke. The basic moralities expressed in the Ten Commandments such as do not kill and do not commit adultery are great guidelines for one?s life but in no way does the entire document belong at a courthouse. The first three commandments, which all revolve around the one Judeo-Christian God, have no place and are not even allowed in public display according to U.S. law. Judge Moore probably is only using this attention to further advance his position in the judicial system like his Ten Commandments plaque in 1980 did for him. Moore should give up attempting to keep the Ten Commandments where it is not supposed to be and I think the removal of the monument by the government was the correct decision.

Separation of Church and State 7 of 10 on the basis of 988 Review.