Smoking bans

Smoking bans
In current events, a huge issue among state and city lawmakers all over the country is the debate over whether or not smoking should be banned in public places. Many argue that allowing people to smoke in public places proposes serious health risks for innocent bystanders. Though the health risks are high, many still oppose the proposal of such laws. Business owners presiding over such establishments as bars and restaurants worry that the smoking bans will severely hurt their revenues if passed. While this is an understandable concern, the health of our communities citizens is much more important than the loss of a handful of customers for businesses. Recently, the House of Representatives approved a bill which stated that smoking should be banned in the private clubs and bars of Vermont. The bill was approved by the House and sent to the Senate for further approval. Ultimately, it seems that the bill was accepted in the House in part because of an emotional plea made by Rep. William Aswad, and also due to the argument that it covered a serious health issue. Rep. Aswad told the group that when his wife had died six year, three months, and fourteen days earlier that the official reported cause of death was simply cigarettes. He said, ?I stand before this body is strong support of this bill. I respectfully ask this body to do likewise.?
At the meeting, Rep. Linda Myers argued that taking away people?s right to smoke in public is a transgression of their constitutional rights. She said of her late husband, who she replaced after his death in the House, ?He would have been appalled at this infringement of individual rights and the rights of our towns to choose their own paths.? Yet another House member, Rep. Brian Dunsmore, opposed to the bill said, ?What are we going to say to our veterans? Those veterans fought, were injured, and died to secure the very liberties this bill is taking away.? Is the smoking ban really an infringement on the citizens liberties and individual rights? Isn?t allowing people to smoke in public places is a step toward protecting their liberties and individual rights? Shouldn?t a non-smoker, who is just as constitutionally protected as the smoker beside him, be allowed the individual right to protect his personal health? The bill, in reality, is a bill proposed to help protect the patrons of businesses that currently allow smoking inside of their establishments. Rep. Francis Brooks stated, ?My smoke from my cigarette should not be going into your lungs. It is not a case of taking rights away from someone who fought for this country.? It was suggested at the hearing that the clubs and bars might actually profit by offering a more welcoming and health conscious environment for customers.
This assertion has been found to be true in Boston, Massachusetts. A recent report from Harvard researchers says that the cities bars and restaurants have gained customers and added jobs since a statewide smoking ban took effect. According to this disclosure, ?they found that tax collections on meals increased nine percent over the first six months of the smoking ban.? Shopkeepers can rest soundly now that their income should not be hurt quite so badly. The well-being of their customers they cater to would be much worse if the bans are not passed.

Smoking bans 9 of 10 on the basis of 1914 Review.