Exploring the Way Shakespeare Presents the Motives for Brutus Killing Caesar

Exploring the Way Shakespeare Presents the Motives for Brutus Killing Caesar
Shakespeare has presented Brutus as a brave courageous man who is very loyal and patriotic to Rome. Brutus even claims he would rather die and lose his honour that see Rome collapse. ?If it ought to be for general good, I?d set honour in one eye and death I?th other I will look on both indifferently?. Shakespeare presents him as a man so loyal to Rome he would kill a man he loves, Caesar, for it. Cassius tries to convince Brutus that Caesar is not physically strong enough, and is weaker than Cassius and Brutus. Brutus replies ?What you have said I will consider?. Cassius has manipulated Brutus but not by a lot because Brutus was already thinking this for himself and Cassius was merely pushing his thoughts further along. Shakespeare makes sure that Brutus is not there to see Caesar be offered the crown. This means that Casca has to tell him what happened. We believed that Casca twists the story of Caesar refusing crown, although we have no proof that Casca has twisted it we believe he does because he say Caesar would ? fain have had it? but we think Caesar truly didn?t want the crown. In act two; scene one Brutus is presented a man with a conscience. We believe this because he cannot sleep, ?Since Cassius did whet me against Caesar, I have not slept?. Because he is thinking about Caesar to much showing he has conscience and won?t just kill Caesar because he can. Shakespeare presents this scene in the dark alone in Brutus?s garden to create an eerie effect making it tense too.
Shakespeare presents it in the garden so it is a bit like the Garden of Eden with the temptation of killing Caesar. Portia describes Brutus as being physically sick ?Is Brutus sick??. Shakespeare presents this in this way to show how it is personally affecting Brutus. When Brutus is talking to Ligarius, the imagery of sickness is used as a metaphor ?a piece of work that will make sick men whole?, ?but are not some whole that we must make sick??. Cassius is scared of Mark Anthony because he thinks he is ?a shrewd contriver? and is going to persuade Rome that the conspirators were wrong to kill Caesar. When Cassius puts it to Brutus to kill Mark Anthony, Brutus says no as he believes that his cause is so right to kill Caesar that the Romans won?t be persuaded. Brutus says that he doesn?t want to be a butcher, but a sacrifice, ?Let?s be sacrifices, not butchers?. Brutus doesn?t want Caesars death to look like murder, ?We?ll be called purgers and not murderers?. Brutus says ?Let?s make a meal fit for the Gods, not a hue for the hounds.? He wants to make it as bloodless as possible. In act three; scene one Caesar is killed. When he is talking to the conspirators he describes himself as being similar to the North Star with Rome revolving around him ?I am constant as the Northern Star?. This is presented like this to give Brutus further motive to kill Caesar, but when Caesar is finally killed, his last words are ?Et tu Brute? ? then falls Caesar?. This demonstrates that Caesar will only die once Brutus has stabbed him, showing us that Caesar had the utmost respect for Brutus and would probably have understood if Brutus had questioned him about the crown. Once Caesar is dead, Brutus says ?ambitions debt is paid?. But this has no effect as the audience feel guilty about Caesars death. Caesar?s death is ironic because he was killed in the Senate, the heart of Roman democracy, and he was killed to keep democracy. Brutus? motives are honourable, but also misguided. Brutus? main motive was to keep democracy and the republic. This is proved because Mark Anthony speaks of him after he is dead and says ?This is the noblest Roman of them all?. For Brutus to kill Caesar was a real struggle and a battle with his conscience. For example, he could not sleep because he was so anxious, ?Since Cassius did whet me against Caesar, I have not slept?. Thos clearly shows that Brutus really did love Caesar. Brutus did not want Caesar to be disgraced and dishonoured and return Rome to a monarchy. Brutus thought it better that Caesar die honourably than live to become a possible tyrant. Brutus was driven by his loyalty to Rome, this is clearly shown when he does not swear an oath, ?No, not an oath.? Without Brutus the other conspirators would probably not have killed Caesar, so great was their respect for him, ?But if it sufficeth that Brutus leads me on?. Despite Brutus? good intentions, his idealistic view of the Roman government would never have been fulfilled, and there would always have been small factions who wanted power for themselves.

Exploring the Way Shakespeare Presents the Motives for Brutus Killing Caesar 7.7 of 10 on the basis of 1752 Review.