India Playing too Much International Cricket

India Playing too Much International Cricket
When India won the Test at Mohali (India), there was much joy and celebration between the players and coaches. Winning a test series against one of the best teams of in the world, to the Indian cricketers there was no better feeling, no better morale booster. For a while, everyone sat around enjoying the moment of victory, but it was not long before practical thoughts entered the minds of players. The match ended in mid-afternoon on Day Four, the early finish of the test match opened up opportunities of leaving for home and seeing the family that they all missed due to a heavy cricket schedule, and suddenly the person most wanted in the changing room in was a travel agent. With four full days before the next game, the players wanted to see their families. The Indian cricket team always has some sort of constant spin going on in it. The team plays every other day, players live out of suitcases for long periods, without seeing there families. After a three-month tour to South Africa the stressed and tired players had just enough time to drop their bags home before heading for the next Test match. Virender Sehwag a key man of the attacking Indian batting line up is quoted after an unsatisfactory session in the nets at Chandigarh, "I am trying to concentrate but I am still jet lagged. I can barely see the ball. This is pretty crazy."
Sehwag is not the only person to be quoted for comments like this, experienced leg spinner Anil Kumble, Sachin Tendulker the person to be voted best cricketer of the century, All Rounder Rahul Dravid have all at one point in there career have complained about the amount of cricket they have to play for there country. This may seem like madness but there is a strong and important reason for this to happen; international sport is driven by economics, demand and supply are some of the factors, and each sport has its own motion and its strange dynamics. In the world market, Indian cricket is a precious product and as everybody manages more cricket, so everybody gets more cricket. While there is reason for this madness, to have more cricket, it should not blind us to the dangers of excess of anything. Tennis players and golfers play throughout the year and they travel much more but their schedules are organized, with sensible gaps between important events. Compare this with the Indian cricket team which changes around and even one free week, if available, is filled by some hastily organised game. These impacts of too much cricket are many as tired players struggle to cope with the punishing schedule. Excessive cricket kills enthusiasm and morale within in the team, reduces players to ?zombies? and, may even lower the quality of cricket being played as one hundred percent effort may not be given at all time, which is vital in cricket. Fitness becomes a major issue and with increased physical strain, player breakdowns are more common. Also Indians are also not the strongest cricketers around, and while the bowlers suffered earlier (Medium Fast Seamer Javagal Srinath, Leg Spinner Anil Kumble) later on it is the turn of stressed out batsmen (Opening batsman S Rameh, All Rounder H Badani, and Sachin Tendulkar) have pulled out due to injuries. There are other serious problems as well. Non stop international cricket robs domestic cricket of its star players, and with top players missing, there is little chance of standards within the league and country picking up. This has an effect as sponsors stay away and Ranji Trophy, the Duleep league slide into a downward spiral which is difficult to come back from, no sponsors may also cause the cricket league go into recession(bankruptcy). With domestic cricket not improving in quality, cricket jobs have shrunk as there is no demand, due to no sponsorship available to pay for the players and businesses are now are reluctant to hire cricketers for sponsorship. This is for two reasons: one ? money is scarce, keeping a cricket team of 15 is expensive; two ? as players are busy with top cricket for long periods with India they don?t play office games. The argument, therefore, is: if Sachin and Rahul can?t play for there county, why bother to hire them? To bring sponsorship deals in, maybe, to give the club more publicity and generate extra revenue by more people coming to matches? Too much cricket can also have an adverse effect on cricketers. As Retired Indian batsman Navjot Singh Sidu is quoted that ?The injuries to some of the key cricketers have confirmed my fears about too much cricket having an adverse effect on the game. It is not just the cricketers but the game itself which will feel the impact?. Injures to high rankers in this time would seem natural to them and would be out of the game for long periods of time as they feel that this is natural for them. Back in the 1980?s players like Sunil Gavaskar and Kapil Dev have been injured but they chose to fight there injuries and come back straight into the game, that is true love of the game. That also shows that Indian cricketers may be putting up with the hectic schedule for greed, to earn more money and increase there wealth. Taking these issues the ideal solution would be to cut back cricket, restrict supply and demand, provide breaks to weary players. But this is unlikely to happen; the hectic pace of the game is a fact of life. India plays an awful lot of cricket but so do other countries, for everyone it is a constant circus, on throughout the year never stopping or ending. For Example England have just finished a major one day tournament (in which India and Sri Lanka shared the trophy) and after just 2 weeks of break and training they are too got to Australia and play the ashes series for 2 months. Meanwhile Australia has just finished a test series with Pakistan (which Australia won 3-0) and no have 2 months of solid cricket ahead of them. In a factual look at cricket economic forces, decide the amount of cricket we get. For instance tomorrow, for whatever reason, if TV networks see a drop in viewing and falling ratings, the sponsorship support will slump, leading to an almost automatic cutback. For greater sense matches could be better scheduled and a balance struck between one-dayers and Tests. Mark Waugh (who last week retired from international cricket) and Sachin made their Test debuts around the same time but Waugh had already played about 120 Tests. To be truthful the selectors need to keep these grounds while picking players, and think to protect the tired and the injured for important battles. In context, the rotation of players for different tournaments - backed up by contracts to ensure a guaranteed cash flow ? is not something to be considered but an urgent need.

India Playing too Much International Cricket 8.9 of 10 on the basis of 4064 Review.