Life's Choices in William Shakespeare's Macbeth and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Life's Choices in William Shakespeare's Macbeth and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein
The choices we make in life can change our lives forever. Throughout the play ?Macbeth? written by William Shakespeare and the novel Frankenstein written by Mary Shelley we learn how the choices made can change peoples lives forever. The main characters within the play ?Macbeth? and the novel Frankenstein make choices to challenge the laws of nature that lead to unforeseen consequences, denial, and death. Some of these are shown within the stories through the loss of family members, the characters taking no responsibility for the consequences that have come from their actions, and the in the end the death of both characters. Throughout the novel Frankenstein and the play ?Macbeth? both Victor Frankenstein and Macbeth lose family members because of their decisions. Victor?s choices to create the beast against the laws of nature bring on the death of his brother, William. "I knew it. Could the demon who hadâ??murdered my brother also in his hellish sport have betrayed the innocent to death and ignominy" (Shelley 69). He had known that the monster had murdered his brother, although he continued on thinking the beast would soon stop, which soon led to the death of his beloved Elizabeth, and soon his father. "As night approaches I found myself at the entrance of the cemetery where William, Elizabeth, and my father repased"
His choices against the laws of nature resulted in the same unforeseen consequences as Macbeth. Macbeth makes choices to work against the laws of nature in murder. ?Our royal master?s murdered? (Shakespeare II, iii, l 88). His choices to murder the royal master Duncan and listen to the witches? prophecies brought much tragedy. These decisions soon lead to the death of his wife Lady Macbeth. ?The queen my lord, is dead? (Shakespeare V, v, ll 16). The loss of his wife does not trouble Macbeth. Macbeth?s choices to murder Duncan led to many more murders such as Banquo; this drew Lady Macbeth to insanity, which soon after caused her death. "She would have died hereafter;/ There would have been a time for such a word" (Shakespeare V, v, ll 17-18). The loss of family members throughout both Frankenstein and ?Macbeth? cause both Victor and Macbeth to deny their actions that they have taken. Victor Frankenstein ignoring the beast and leading the beast to anger and Macbeth?s choices to murder for power led to denial. As time passes Victor and Macbeth choose not to admit to what they have done in either creating the beast or to the murder of Duncan. Victor, after the death of William, denies his creation of the beast. He does not take any responsibility for what he has done. "Nothing in human shape could have destroyed that fair child. He was the murderer!" (Shelley 60). Frankenstein does not admit to the fact that he could have caused all of these murders to happen. "The mere presence of the idea was an irresistible proof of the fact" (Shelley 60). He did not want to think he was the cause. Macbeth was a character who took his knowledge, went against the laws of nature and caused his wife?s insanity. Macbeth took no responsibility for her insanity. "To the last syllable of recorded time;/ And all our yesterdays have lighted fools/ The way to dusty death" (Shakespeare V, v, ll 21-24). The denial in Macbeth is seen on his face, he does not feel that his actions in killing Duncan and Banquo for power drove Lady Macbeth to kill herself. ?Life?s but a walking shadow a poor player/ That struts and frets his hour upon the stage, / And is heard no more: it is a tale/ told by and idiot, full of sound and fury, / signifying nothing" (Shakespeare V, vi, ll 24-28). Macbeth and Frankenstein take no responsibility for their actions. This denial expands significantly causing the death of both characters. Macbeth and Victor Frankenstein have made many choices to challenge the laws of nature. Victor losses his life over his choices to challenge the laws of nature and created the beast. The monster soon gained power over Victor and eventually Victor?s efforts against the beast led Victor to great exhaustion and illness that he passed away. ?His voice became fainter as he spoke and at length, exhausted by his effort, he sank into silence. About half an hour afterwards he attempted again to speak but was unable, he pressed my hand feebly, and his eyes closed foreverâ??" (Shelley 200). Victor?s efforts in denial of the beast could have been different if he was not so desperate for the creation of life. ?No one can conceive the anguish I suffered during the remainder of the nightâ??I considered the being whom I had cast among mankind and endowed with the will and power to effect purposes of horrorâ??my own spirit let loose from the grave and forced to destroy all that was dear to me." (Shelley 61). Macbeth in the same way made his choices against the laws of nature. Macbeth first realizes he is in trouble when he is told that Macduff is not ?of woman born? (Shakespeare iiv, i, l 80). "Tell thee, Macduff was from his mothers womb/ untimely ripp?d" (Shakespeare V, vii, ll 44-45). Once this is found Macbeth losses control and realizes his death is near. He tries not to show now that he is scared. "If this which he avouches does appear, / there is nor flying hence, nor tarrying here/ I? gin to be a weary of the sun." (Shakespeare V, vi, ll 47-49). Victor and Macbeth have now lost their lives because of their shameful choices. In conclusion, we have read and now know the similarities between Macbeth from the play ?Macbeth? by William Shakespeare and Victor Frankenstein from the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and how the choices we make in life can impact on our lives greatly. It was shown through consequences, denial, and death. Work Cited Shakespeare, William. Macbeth.

Life's Choices in William Shakespeare's Macbeth and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein 8.4 of 10 on the basis of 1715 Review.