Little Opposition to Hitler Due to Propaganda

Little Opposition to Hitler Due to Propaganda
You?ll have your hands full from now on. I just can?t accept that now people will be in peril of their lives because of other people. I can?t accept it and I find it horrifying. Never tell me that it?s for the sake of Fatherland. -Sophie Scholl The Nazis faced relatively little open opposition during their 12 years in power. In private, Germans complained about the regime and its actions, although not all. Some might refuse to give the Nazi salute; they might pass on anti-Nazi jokes and rude stories about senior Nazis. However, serious criticism was always in private, never in public. Historians have debated why this was so. There were many contributions to why they kept quiet, whether it was fear, propaganda or admiration for Hitler or a mixture of all three. Propaganda is information that is spread for the purpose of promoting some cause. Underlying the whole regime was the propaganda machine. This ensured that many Germans found out very little about the bad things that were happening, or if they did it was from a pro-Nazi perspective.
Propaganda was important in maintaining Hitler?s perfect image. Propaganda took many forms, through film, posters, slogans and education. If they were able to post millions of posters around Germany, with the effect of film and education as well, people will see it so much they will begin to believe it. They were indoctrinating young people through education, adults through posters and films. All was good; they got their support and long awaited control. Children were expected to join Nazi youth organisations. The Hitler Youth and League of German Maidens prepared boys for war and girls for motherhood; they also promoted Nazi behaviour and gave them control over the youth. Education was also important to the Nazis and lessons were all geared towards making the boys good soldiers and the girl?s good mothers. Lessons were used to pass on ideas about war and about racial superiority. Maths problems made the children calculate bombing ranges and the cost of keeping the mentally ill alive. Biology and History lessons were used to say that Germans were better than any other nation, but it was particularly important because this was a way of making future generations into Nazi supporters. The media was also controlled by Josef Goebbels, who was a main disputer of the propaganda. Loudspeakers were set up in public places to broadcast Hitler?s speeches. He controlled the press and decided what photographs should be printed, he arranged for posters to be put up, and he made sure Hitler?s speeches were broadcast on the radio. It was also Goebbels who planned the big party rallies and publicised everything Hitler did. Fear and terror was also a main contributor to keeping opposition to a minimum. Force was used where propaganda and education had failed. If the people could not be convinced that the Nazis were right then they were punished or removed from society so that they could not oppose Hitler. Therefore, force was important as a back up if propaganda failed. Official government bodies were used to suppress any criticism or opposition of Hitler and the Nazis. Many people were imprisoned by the SS and the Gestapo. Anyone within the Nazi party who was not thought to be totally loyal was eliminated. Ernst Rohm was killed in the Night of the Long Knives in 1934. In addition, organisations which could challenge Hitler?s control were taken over or destroyed. Force was often used to close down other organisations if they could not be ?peacefully? taken over. Organisations which could challenge Hitler?s control were taken over or destroyed. Germany had been hit so hard by the depression people were terrified by the prospect of being out of a job again. Trade unions were closed down and workers had to join the Nazi Labour Front. If you kept your head down, life in Nazi Germany could be comfortable. ?Keeping your head down? became a national obsession. The SS and its special security service the SD went to great lengths to find out what people were saying about the regime, often by listening in to conversations in cafes and bars. Your job could depend on the silence. Admiration for Hitler was another opposition killer. Many Germans admired and trusted Hitler. They were prepared to tolerate rule by terror and to trade their rights in political freedom and free speech in return for work, foreign policy success and what they thought was a strong government. Economic was deeply appreciated as more jobs were provided and a more stable economy. Many felt that the Nazis were bringing some much needed discipline back to Germany by restoring traditional values and clamping down on rowdy Communists. Between 1933 and 1938 Hitler?s successes in foreign affairs made Germans feel that their country was a great power again after the humiliations of WW1 and the Treaty of Versailles. For many Germans, the dubious methods of the Nazis may have been regrettable but necessary for the greater good of the country. If all people thought like this it would mean the Nazis would have control over what they thought. For their part, the German generals expressed admiration for Hitler?s political skills and goals. His defence minister from 1933 to 1938, General Werner von Blomberg, said that Hitler?s rise to power represented ?a broad national desire, and the realisation of that towards which many of the best have been striving for years?. All three ideas link in the way that the Nazis were able to control the German people. The three ideas worked together so that all groups of society would follow Nazi ideas but the use of force was probably the most important, since it meant that those who did not accept Hitler?s ideas would be too frightened to do anything and therefore no-one would actually oppose the Nazis. Germanybecame a nation of snoops. People were employed in each street, in each building complex etc. with the sole purpose of keeping an eye on others in their ?area? and reporting them to the authorities if they believed that something was amiss. The reputation of the Nazi police and the secret police lead by Himmler was such that no-one wished to cause offence. People kept their thoughts to themselves unless they wished to invite trouble. In this sense, Nazi Germany was a nation run on fear of the government. Hitler had created a one party state within months of being appointed chancellor.

Little Opposition to Hitler Due to Propaganda 8.7 of 10 on the basis of 4113 Review.