Gallipoli

Gallipoli

Gallipoli, a favorite war movie of mine, is an Australian movie of the fateful First World War battle of Gallipoli. Directed and co-written by the talented Australian native Peter Weir; Gallipoli is a wonderfully written drama about two best friends, Archy Hamilton and Frank Dunne, who put aside their hopes and dreams when they join the war effort. The first half of the film is devoted to their lives and their strong friendship. The second half details the doomed war efforts of the Aussies, who are no match for the powerful and aggressive Turkish army.
The story begins in Australia during the early stages of the War in 1915 where two young men become friends and decide to enlist together. They pursue their goal, go through training in Egypt, and wind up in Turkey at Gallipoli, one of the early and important engagements of the conflict. The first main character is country boy rancher named Archy Hamilton played by Mark Lee, who is being trained by his uncle as a world-class runner, but Archy who dreams of romance and excitement is eager to run away from the center of nowhere and become a soldier.
Archy meets the city kid Frank Dunne, who is played by Mel Gibson, when he beats him in a track meet. Archy convinces Frank of the advantages of enlisting for God and and the country, and they decide upon joining the Light Horse Cavalry. The only trouble is that Archy is not old enough to enlist and Frank can't ride a horse. Overcoming these obstacles, Archy finally signs up against the wishes of his family.
The second half of the film recounts their exploits just before and during the fateful battle of Gallipoli. In Egypt, Frank and his friends are camped near the Pyramids and spend their free time in the city of Cairo, drinking, getting ripped off by merchants and visiting brothels. During a chaotic training exercise, Frank and Archy meet once again and Frank is able to transfer to the light horse because they are now being sent to the Gallipoli peninsula as infantry and not have to ride the horses.
Frank and Archy arrived at Anzac Cove and endure the hardship and boredom of trench warfare that went on for much of the campaign. Frank's infantry friends fought in the evening battle of Lone Pine, which was talked about but not shown. The following morning Archy and Frank took part in the charge at the Nek, which was to act as a diversion in support of the British landing at Suvla. Frank was made a runner for the regiment commander, Major Barton who was played by Bill Hunter.
The Light Horse attacked in three waves across a narrow stretch of exposed ground defended by machine guns. The first wave was timed to go at the end of an artillery bombardment. The first wave went over the top and was cut down; the second wave follows to the same fate. Major Barton wanted to halt the attack, but the brigade English commander Colonel Robinson, remote from his dugout, gets a scrambled message that marker flags which was used to signal to friendly artillery, have been seen in the Turkish trenches before the artillery cut the phone lines. Barton gives Frank a message to carry to the Headquarters but when he arrives, Robinson insists the attack continue.
Frank runs to the beach to division commander General Gardiner, an Australian, headquarters. The general gives Frank the message that he is "reconsidering the whole situation" effectively canceling the attack. As Frank sprints back, the phone lines are fixed and Robinson tells Barton to push on. Archy and the rest of the third wave go over the top. The final frame freezes on Archy and shows him getting shot.
Overall the film is excellent, well written, directed, acted, an extremely moving story, and I believe somewhat historically accurate. The relationship between the two main characters does take sometime to develop, however it's that well developed bond that makes the movie so much more endearing and, in the end, that much more tragic.http://www.oppapers.com/essays/Gallipoli/62476

Gallipoli 8.7 of 10 on the basis of 4147 Review.