Groth of the self

Groth of the self
Unfortunately I was not able to make it to our last site visit and to our group meeting. I had a terrible cold and needed rest. However, I emailed one of my group members so that she could up date me. I also made sure to call my students and apologize for my absence.

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Simulation-supported Wargaming in MNE 4

Simulation-supported Wargaming in MNE 4
1. Introduction
The objective of this document is to emphasize the importance of simulation as a measure of complexity reduction and planner?s tool for decision support in MNE 4?s Effects-Based Planning (EBP) process. Starting with an overview of the underlying principles of Wargaming and Modeling and Simulation (M&S), the outcome of this abstract is a ?Process for the application of simulation to support Wargaming in MNE 4?. This document may also serve as a basis for MNE 4 design and execution decision-makers in order to determine the value of simulation as a wargaming tool for MNE 4.

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Women in a Man's World in Eliza Fenwick's Secresy

Women in a Man's World in Eliza Fenwick's Secresy
In examining how women fit into the "men's world" of the late eighteenth century, I studied Eliza Fenwick's novel Secresy and its treatment of women, particularly in terms of education. What I found to be most striking in the novel is the clash between two very different approaches to the education of women. One of these, the traditional view, is amply expressed by works such as Jean-Jaques Rousseau's Emile, which states that women have a natural tendency toward obedience and therefore education should be geared to enhance these qualities (Rousseau, pp. 370, 382, 366). Dr. John Gregory's A Father's Legacy to His Daughters also belongs to this school of thought, stating that wit is a woman's "most dangerous talent" and is best kept a well-guarded secret so as not to excite the jealousy of others (Gregory, p. 15). This view, which sees women as morally and intellectually inferior, is expressed in the novel in the character of Mr. Valmont, who incarcerates his orphaned niece in a remote part of his castle. He asserts that he has determined her lot in life and that her only duty is to obey him "without reserve or discussion" (Fenwick, p.55). This oppressive view of education served to keep women subservient by keeping them in an ignorant, child-like state. By denying them access to true wisdom and the right to think, women were reduced to the position of "a timid, docile slave, whose thoughts, will, passions, wishes, should have no standard of their own, but rise, or change or die as the will of the master should require"

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Citi Launches Citifx Pro

Citi Launches Citifx Pro
On March 25, 2008, Citi launched CitiFX Pro, an online foreign exchange trading platform for active individual and small institutional traders. The program is now available in the U.S., where users can download a free demo of the application and apply for a trading account. The product will be launched in other parts of the world over the next few months.

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Information Systems for Human Resources Management

Information Systems for Human Resources Management
Information is an essential tool for managers in the retention, recruitment, utilization and evaluation of human resources in health services organizations. Since they support the goals and objectives of the organization, information systems play an important role in planning and management of human resources. These systems will serve as an important personnel administration operational programs, including employee record keeping, budget control, compensation, benefits management, and government reporting.

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To Kill A Mockingbird - Symbols

To Kill A Mockingbird - Symbols
A symbol is a word or expression which signifies something other than the physical object to which it directly refers. The book ?To Kill A Mockingbird? by Harper Lee contains three recognizable symbols.
?Mockingbirds don?t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don?t eat up people?s gardens, don?t nest in corncribs, they don?t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That?s why it?s a sin to kill a mockingbird.? (103) This could possibly be a symbol for Tom Robinson. He was innocent, yet sentenced to death because of his ethnicity. Robinson could also be a symbol of the mockingbird in another way, killing him produced neither good nor prevented any evil, just like killing a mockingbird. Since Maycomb County never sees Boo Radley, they blame him for all of the small unexplained happenings and crimes. Atticus doesn?t believe that he should be punished for these crimes. Scout says that it would be a little like killing a mockingbird.

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Factors of a Job Evaluation Scheme

Factors of a Job Evaluation Scheme
A job evaluation scheme is ?a method to determine the value of each job in relation to all jobs within the organization.? A job evaluation process is useful because sometimes job titles can be misleading- either unclear or unspecific- and in large organizations it?s impossible for those in HR to know each job in detail. The use of job evaluation techniques depends on individual circumstances.

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The Life of Charles Babbage

The Life of Charles Babbage
Born December 26, 1791 in Teignmouth, Devonshire UK, Charles Babbage was known as the ?Father of Computing? for his contributions to the basic design of the computer through his Analytical Engine. The Analytical Engine was the earliest expression of an all-purpose, programmable computer. His previous Difference Engine was a special purpose device intended for the production of tables. Both the Difference and Analytical Engines were the earliest direct progenitors of modern computers.

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Cognitive Turn and Linguistic Turn

Cognitive Turn and Linguistic Turn
My first goal is to question a received view about the development of Analytical Philosophy. According to this received view Analytical Philosophy is born out of a Linguistic Turn establishing the study of language as the foundation of the discipline; this primacy of language is then overthrown by the return of the study of mind as philosophia prima through a second Cognitive Turn taken in the mid-sixties. My contention is that this picture is a gross oversimplification and that the Cognitive Turn should better be seen as an extension of the Linguistic one. Indeed, if the Cognitive Turn gives explicit logical priority to the study of mind over the study of language, one of its central features is to see the mind as a representational system offering no substantial difference with a linguistic one. However, no justification is offered for the fundamental assimilation of the nature of a mental representation with that of a linguistic symbol supporting this picture of the mind, although the idea that a system of mental representations is identical in structure with a system of linguistic symbols has been argued over and over. I try to demonstrate this point through a close critical examination of Fodor's paradigmatic notion of 'double reduction.' My second claim is that the widespread contemporary assimilation of a mental representation with a symbol of a linguistic kind is no more than a prejudice. Finally I indicate that this prejudice cannot survive a rigorous critical examination.

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Decision Support Systems

Decision Support Systems
A Decision Support System (DSS) is an information system at the management level of an organization that combines data, analytical tools, and models to support semistructured and unstructured decision-making. A DSS can handle low volume or massive databases optimized for data analysis. DSS has more power than other systems. They are built explicitly with a variety of models to analyze data or they condense large amounts of data into a form where they can be analyzed by decision-makers. DSS are designed so that the user can work with them directly. In the proceeding paragraphs I will give examples of some decision support systems and how they are being used.

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