The Effect of Toys on a Person's Psychological Development

The Effect of Toys on a Person's Psychological Development
You probably remember your favorite game from early childhood?many people do. The game most likely involved your favorite toy, perhaps a truck, or a doll. In fact, when you think about memories from your childhood, toys should be among the first things to come to mind to evoke a strong image of early childhood. Toys have been greatly underestimated by their possessors and especially by adults, dismissed as the ?supporting role? in indoor or outdoor pastimes, which they literally are. However, toys affect a person?s psychological development to a higher degree than we may realize.

Read More: The Effect of Toys on a Person's Psychological Development

Miller's Presentation of the Theme Of Greed And Envy within The Crucible

Miller's Presentation of the Theme Of Greed And Envy within The Crucible
?The Crucible? was written in 1953 by Arthur Miller in the time of the cold war, although the play was set in 1692. The play is about a town called Salem in America and about the witch-hunts that took place there. Because it was written in this time period there is a feeling of mistrust, greed and envy echoed in the play. Arthur Miller plays on these feelings and produces a theme of greed and envy that is critical to the whole play. I will be discussing this theme further. Miller first introduces the theme of greed and envy by creating many social tensions in Act 1. We can tell there are social tensions because of the way the people speak to each other, such as when Mr Putnam says to Mr Parris ??No witchcraft! Now look you, Mr Parris -?? (Pg 10.) This shows us that Parris and Putnam must have a history between them of unfriendly feelings, as not many people would dare stand up to a minister. This unfriendliness is confirmed by the piece of analytical text Miller has included (pg 11) to help us understand it better. In this piece of text he writes, ?Some time before, Thomas Putnam?s brother-in-law, James Bayley, had been turned down as minister of Salem.? This gives us the idea that Putnam is resentful of Mr Parris, because Parris acquired the job Putnam?s brother-in-law would have got. Another example of social tension is when Mrs Putnam says, "You think it God?s work you should never lose a child, nor a grandchild either, and I bury all but one?"

Read More: Miller's Presentation of the Theme Of Greed And Envy within The Crucible

Tragic Love in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

Tragic Love in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet
Tragedy was very popular in Shakespeare?s day. The majority had a climax at the end involving many dead bodies finishing on stage. Most other play writers at this time also wrote tragedies like John Webster who wrote ?the witch devil?. Romeo and Juliet was the first major tragedy. It was before ?the big four? which was Macbeth, Othello, Hamlet and King Lear which were written between (1600-1606).All of Shakespeare tragic heroes are doomed almost from the start due to a fatal flaw in their personality. E.g. Macbeth was too analytical, thoughtful, and not a man of action. Othello is overly jealous. Romeo is far too romantic, hasty and fickle. Maybe they were both doomed from the start. Fate is one of the key reason why the play ends in tragedy. The two families are rivals so it is fate from the start when they meet. ?His name is Romeo, and a Mountague, the son of your great enemy? The nurse says this to Juliet when Juliet meets Romeo for the fast time. In the scene it tells you the whole plot of the play so this is fate, we know from the beginning. ?From forth the fatal loins of these two foes, a pair of star-crossed lovers take their life?. This is saying that 2 lovers from different families will take their lives to be together. Shakespeare used this to get the crowds attention because it mentions people dying which would get the attention of the audience.

Read More: Tragic Love in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet

The Relationship Between Women and Film

The Relationship Between Women and Film
My hypothesis is ?the representation of women in Japanese action/thriller films and, Hollywood action/thriller films focusing on the Asian genre, are different?. I started my investigation by looking at secondary research; the first being the internet. I used the search engine ?Google? which was useful in providing a range of sites focusing on my hypothesis. I started by typing in ?Japanese representation of women vs. Hollywood representation of women?. This search was too broad, and I realised that I needed to refine my search to get specific areas of interest regarding my hypothesis. The internet is a mass media platform that needs to be used correctly to search for the correct information needed, and thus searches cannot be too broad. Therefore, I decided to search for specific films that I would be referencing. These films included ?The Ring? (Japanese ? 1998 and Hollywood version ? 2002), Japanese anime with specific reference to ?Princess Mononoke? (1997), ?Kill Bill Vol.1? (2003) and ?Mulan? (1998), a Disney film reflecting Asian culture and genre. I started by looking at the films? synopses to work out how each film reflected the representation of women. Two sites which proved really useful were www.imdb.com and www.cinema.com that provided detailed plot analysis and reviews

Read More: The Relationship Between Women and Film

Customer Behaviour

Customer Behaviour
1.1 The aims of this assignment is to find out what I understand about Customer Behaviour and the knowledge we have about different buying habits of customers what makes us as consumers purchase that particular product from the shops. If you look at any product whether they are clothes, shoes, or even if they are household items like food and toiletries it normally has a story behind it to sell that product, in this case that brand. Marketers can influence consumers to buy any product they want, they do this by using a process known as market concepts this process is used in every day life whether it is a superstore or the local corner shop selling milk and bread.

Read More: Customer Behaviour

Finding the Exact Concentration of Sulphuric Acid in a Solution Through a Titration

Finding the Exact Concentration of Sulphuric Acid in a Solution Through a Titration
Aim: To find the exact concentration of sulphuric acid in a solutionthrough a titration. The titration is between sulphuric acid andsodium carbonate has to be in liquid for in order to carry out theexperiment so it is dissolved into distilled water to a concentrationof 0.1 mol dm³Introduction--?????During the extraction of a metal from its ore, sulphuric dioxide isoften produced. This is converted to sulphuric acid and is sold as auseful by-product. I am going to be given a sample of sulphuric acid,which is thought to have a concentration between 0.05 and 0.15-moldm³

Read More: Finding the Exact Concentration of Sulphuric Acid in a Solution Through a Titration

Feminist Geography

Feminist Geography
Since its conception, geography has been involved in the development of races and genders, mapping the boundaries that separate and exclude the world of privilege from the other. The imperial eyes that facilitated this domination have recently been challenged to nullify their perpetuation of racial difference, and although existing more obscurely, to challenge the sexist legacy remaining in geography. ?As part of geography, feminist approaches within our discipline take the same set of central concepts as their focus as other sub-areas of geography. Thus over the decade feminist geographers have addressed three of the central concepts of the discipline ? space, place and nature ? and the ways in which these are implicated in the structure of gender divisions in different societies? (McDowell, 1993). The above quotation illustrates the fundamental point of feminist geography; it is no different from geography as a whole in terms of concepts, only in perspective. Women have remained invisible throughout most of the history of the discipline, and where they have been represented, it has been in subordinate roles, highlighting the world of work as a world for men.

Read More: Feminist Geography

Working Class Realism by John Hilll

Working Class Realism by John Hilll
When ?Working class realism? emerged within British cinema in 1956, it became acknowledged as a break of determination to tackle certain social and real issues. This was presented as a ?New Wave? within British film and offered an opposition to the original procedures and approaches to British Cinema. ?Working class realism? an analytical piece by John Hill, reveals to us how, coinciding with the ?new Britain? that was stabilizing and evolving after the war, was a ?New wave? of British social problem films. They were acknowledged for the fact that they were ?realist? films with a purpose to reveal the reality of Britain onto the film screen without disguising it with the ?Hollywood style? facades. This new concept involved the revolutionary move to include the industrial working class within it and diverse from the social groups previously portrayed through film. These British ?new wave? films began to include youthful protagonists, absorbed in the period?s thriving society, which seemed to portray the relevant themes and the social issues at this time.

Read More: Working Class Realism by John Hilll

Theme of Isolation in Dekker's Blink and Taylor's Julie

Theme of Isolation in Dekker's Blink and Taylor's Julie
Many people experience isolation throughout their lives. Isolation is withdrawal from society or feeling of being disconnected from a certain group. Why is there isolation? What causes isolation? What might it lead to? There are various factors that can lead to isolation. People can be easily isolated by their knowledge, background or by their differences. There are effects that can also occur due to isolation. There are a lot of questions regarding isolation and alienation. There are literatures and novels relating to this issue such as Blink and Julie.

Read More: Theme of Isolation in Dekker's Blink and Taylor's Julie

Bead Bar Case Study

Bead Bar Case Study
Bead Bar is a growing company that specializes in allowing customers to create their own bead jewelry. With six major locations, a Bead Bar on board, and businesses that want to be part of the company makes Bead Bar a successful company. In order to keep up and track business the company asks us to implement a systems development plan that will integrate the company into the technological world. Today I will be outlining the systems development plan that will guarantee the switch over runs easily.
The systems development plan is like a blueprint it ensures that everyone understands what they need to do and that the owner knows exactly what she is paying for. There are seven phases when developing a systems plan they are: (1) planning, (2) systems analysis, (3) systems design, (4) development, (5) testing, (6) implementation, and (7) maintenance.

Read More: Bead Bar Case Study