Tourism in Dubai

Tourism in Dubai
The broad context of this project is based on the ? managing tourism? part of my geography course. The aim of this project is to study the reasons of the rapid growth of tourism in Dubai and the different ways of identifying and classifying the different types of tourists that visit Dubai. Objective: To create three different hypotheses related to tourism and tourists in Dubai that can be tested using a range of primary and secondary data collection techniques. Hypothesis 1: Most tourists come from Europe. Hypothesis 2: Most tourists come to Dubai for the weather and the beach. Hypothesis 3: Figure 1 The further the distance tourists come from, the longer they stay in Dubai. Justification of Hypothesis1: Most tourists come from Europe In Dubai, most things are cheap as there are no taxes. However, all countries in Europe have high taxes are very high so the low prices of goods in the uae attract a lot of European tourists. Figure 2 clearly shows the difference of taxes in Europe and the U.A.E. Average total % taxes in Europe Total % taxes in the U.A.E 40.8% 0% Figure 2 Tourists from Europe come to the Dubai when it is winter in their country; they come to appreciate the warm weather on the beach. Since the Euro currency started more Europeans come to Dubai as it is more beneficial for them. From figure 3 we can see that 38% of the tourists were European and that is the largest category. However, this was in 2002 and I will see if my hypothesis is correct for 2005. Breakdown of foreign visitors to Dubai by nationality in 2002 [image] Figure 3 Justification of hypothesis 2: Most tourists come to Dubai for the Beach and the weather When it is winter in other countries, the tourists come to Dubai to appreciate the good weather. If the weather is good then it is ideal to go to the beach because in other continents such as Europe or America people can only go to the beach in summer because that is the only time the weather is good enough. Also, in other countries, beaches are crowded during summer and they can also be dirty, which is not the case in Dubai.

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Water and Marine Resources

Water and Marine Resources
Introduction Water is one of the most important inorganic compounds in the world, playing vital physical, biological and chemical roles. For many governments the main challenge for the twenty-first century is how to ensure a reliable supply of good- quality, fresh water. This chapter is divided into two sections. The first concentrates on fresh water, whilst the second deals with salt water. Such a division is convenient from a human viewpoint but is of no relevance from an environmental viewpoint because the different states in which water exists are not restricted by salt and fresh water definitions. Water location and water disputes Vast areas of the world are already deficient in a supply of freshwater. These water deficiencies are often the result of poor management of the water resource, rather than an overall lack of precipitation. Disputes over water extraction from rivers have grown in number and severity in recent years. As the shortfall between demand and supply of water increases so international disputes over water availability are also set to grow. The World Resources Institute in 1996 estimated that 40% of the world?s population gets its water from just 214 major river catchment zones. Of these, 148 are shared between two countries and a further 50 are shared between three or more countries.

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Porosity and Permeability

Porosity and Permeability
The vast majority of geological materials can hold water to a greater or lesser extent, the amount of water if affected by the materials porosity and permeability. Porosity is a parameter that describes the amount of open space in geologic material, it can be stated as either a fractional value or percentage of the material that is open space. This open space is not however a void like the interior of a balloon it is more like a sponge with small air bubbles and interconnecting pores. These open pore spaces occur between sediment grains, in cracks or fractures and also on a larger scale in cavernous openings formed by dissolution of rock. The porosity values of rock typically range from 0-50%, this space is often filled with water or air or mixture of both. Permeability is closely linked to porosity as permeability is a parameter that describes the ability of geological material to transmit water.

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The Factors that Affect the Mass of Copper

The Factors that Affect the Mass of Copper
Electrolysis is the decomposition of a molten or aqueous compound by electricity. Electrolysis occurs only in liquids called electrolytes. Electrolytes are compounds, which conduct electricity when molten or dissolved in water, but not when they are in a solid state as the oppositely charged ions are held together by strong ionic bonds in a giant lattice and this means electricity cannot pass through it and the ions are unable to move. If electrolytes are molten or dissolved in water their ions are free to move, and the movement of ions in liquids is key in electrolysis. Electrolysis takes place in an electrolyte cell. The diagram below shows the apparatus used in the electrolysis of molten or aqueous ionic compounds. The electrodes (anode and cathode) are known as conducting rods. Normally they are made out of platinum or graphite as these substances are chemically unreactive and will not interfere with the experiment. They are inert electrodes. However in this experiment we are using copper electrodes. Copper electrodes are active electrodes and these metal electrodes take part in electrolysis. Copper electrodes are used in industry to obtain pure copper

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The Ethics of Cloning

The Ethics of Cloning
A couple that had been married for only two years was in a terrible car accident. The wife walked away with a few cuts and bruises. The husband, however was unconscious when the paramedics arrived. He went into a coma shortly after arriving at the nearby hospital. He came out of the coma but was never to be the same again. It turns out that when he was in the accident he had severe head trauma, and would be a vegetable the rest of his life. He could not take part in the reproduction of children. The wife is now distraught because they will never have children together. She heard about the possibility of cloning and believes that it is the only way that she will ever have children. Is it so?

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Australia

Australia
Australia, the continent down under, filled with kangaroos, koala bears, and many more unique creatures. I always wanted to go to Australia, but never knew much about it, like the history behind it, and what there really is to do. So I decided to research it and talk to people that are familiar with it.

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Positive and Negative Effects of Tourism

Positive and Negative Effects of Tourism
I have discovered that many locals heavily rely upon tourists to earn their livings and to afford to live in such an expensive area as Castleton, where a small cottage will cost about £100,000. Locals running services for tourists do inflate their prices therefore creating much profit, particularly in the summer months. This is not a problem for locals as their lives and livelihoods have certainly been protected by the attraction of the quaint village in the countryside which is appealing to many city dwellers, i will go into detail on these issues later in this section of my project. There is also a downside to this for the locals. The locals don?t have many services for themselves in the village, there are virtually no shops for locals. Also tourists cause many other problems such as traffic ? the roads are often congested, litter and noise. There are also some conflicts over land use. The locals do have some benefits from the tourist industry, such as good public transport links, but they wish for something to be done about the many problems in the village.

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The Features and Processes of a River Along Its Profile

The Features and Processes of a River Along Its Profile
Along the path of a river, from source to mouth, the river shows many different features and is affected by several different processes. These processes are going to be described and explained in the course of this essay and diagrams will be used to back-up and justify my ideas. A river can be simply divided into an upland or lowland river environment. Upland features and processes occur at a higher altitude, closer to the source of the river; lowland features and processes occur at lower altitudes near the mouth of a river. A river?s course can be better divided into a young, mature and old stage. A simple map of a river showing the different stages is shown below: The main processes acting upon a river are:
Erosion
Transportation
Deposition

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Biology Practical

Biology Practical
Aim: The aim of this practical experiment is to compare the rate of utilisation of food reserves during the germination of seeds of the two following species/types: Monocotyledons, and Dicotyledons. Background Knowledge: Using the knowledge I have gained from my A-level and course, and from the various sources of information listed in my references page, I have found the following information on seed growth and germination: There are two main types of seeds: Monocotyledon and Dicotyledon. They differ from each other as shown in the diagram below: [image][image] Germination is the onset of growth of the embryo in a seed, usually after a period of dormancy. Dormancy is the state where germination will not occur, even if the conditions are right. Seeds undergo a number of stages during germination and various conditions have to be met for a seed to start its growth cycle: The first stage of germination in water uptake: The seeds must have 40-60% moisture content for germination to occur. The next stage is the Digestion and Translocation stage. The diagram below shows how the seed begins its growth cycle

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Crude Oil

Crude Oil
Crude oil is a naturally-occurring substance found trapped in certain
rocks below the earth?s crust. It is a dark, sticky liquid which,
scientifically speaking, is classed as a hydrocarbon. This means, it
is a compound containing only hydrogen and carbon. Crude oil is highly
flammable and can be burned to create energy. Along with its sister
hydrocarbon, natural gas, crude oil makes an excellent fuel.

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