For Whom the Bell Tolls: A Study of Psychology

For Whom the Bell Tolls: A Study of Psychology
When many think of wars, the first thought that comes to mind is the land which was fought over and which side won. They never consider the psychological side effect soldiers endure during war. For many, this is the only side they see so there is no exposure except through writers such as Ernest Hemingway. In For Whom the Bell Tolls, Hemingway captivates the realism of war through his own eyes. Drawing from his own observation and experiences as an ambulance driver, Hemingway shows the psychological damage of war through the destruction of human lives, uncommitted relationships, and lack of confidence.

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Torture

Torture
The United Nations Convention against Torture (1987) developed the most widely used definition of torture, stating that torture is ?any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person, information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has committed or is suspected of having committed, or intimidating or coercing him or a third person, or for any reason based on discrimination of any kind, when such pain or suffering is inflicted by or at the instigation of or with the consent or acquiescence of a public official or other person acting in an official capacity. It does not include pain or suffering arising only from, inherent in or incidental to lawful sanctions.?

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Cognitive Psychology of Science

Cognitive Psychology of Science
Toward a Cognitive Psychology of Science: Recent Research and Its Implications
In the article written by Ryan Tweney, he is contemplating the idea of whether there is a cognitive significance to scientific thinking. Many different studies are mentioned to try and answer this contemplation. One study on discovering the complexity of the universe found that subjects did the best if they confirmed evidence supporting their hypothesis early, and disconfirmed evidence later; this explains the persistence of many scientists. Another study found that the subjects could be divided into ?experimenters? or ?theorists.?

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Objective Psychology and Psychoanalysis

Objective Psychology and Psychoanalysis
1. Objective psychology and psychoanalysis have much in common. Wulff compares these studies on page two hundred and fifty eight by stating ?both reject unaided introspection as a means of gathering fundamental data.? In other words, in neither psychoanalysis nor objective psychology, can a person take an observation made from themselves about themselves and consider it fundamental data. Another similarity would be ?that human conduct is the outcome of complexly determined casual events that lie outside awareness?

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A Whale of a Passion for Psychology

A Whale of a Passion for Psychology
A beluga whale helped me first realize my true academic passion. I spent my high school summers and weekends volunteering at the New York Aquarium, first in the education department, and later in the training department. It was there, through casual and research-oriented observations of cetaceans, that I began to wonder about animal and human minds. I later had the opportunity to participate in an observational research project, helping to record data on the behaviors of new whale calves and mothers. My informal and formal observations fed my interest in the phylogenetic and ontogenetic bases of cognition and language.

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Brief Survey of Psychology

Brief Survey of Psychology
Psychology seems to be like the science of perception turned into prejudices. I know there is a lot more to it than that, but that seemed to be what Kevin was focusing on. This does not mean bad prejudices like racial prejudices, but good ones like when I go to sleep tonight I will wake up tomorrow. I believe I will wake up tomorrow because I woke up today, if I did not believe that I might have a hard time getting to sleep since I would fear not waking up. So when people who saw a picture of a young girl, then they were shown a picture of both the old woman and the young girl together, they were very likely to fist see the young girl.

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Plato's Moral Psychology

Plato's Moral Psychology
I argue that Plato's psychological theories are motivated by concerns he had about moral theory. In particular, Plato rejects the modern account of rationality as the maximization of subjectively evaluated self-interest because, had he adopted such an account, his theory of justice would be subject to criticisms which he holds are fatal to the contractarian theory of justice. While formulating a theory to remain within ethical constraints sometimes violates the canons of scientific theorizing, Plato avoids this mistake.

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Gender Bias in Psychology

Gender Bias in Psychology
In psychology, there seems to be a bias towards females, leading to
the misinterpretation of women. For example in experimental studies,
the performance of the participants tends to be influenced by the
expectations of the investigator. People have lower expectations for
women; therefore we collect data showing lower task performance for
them.

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Teratogens and Developmental Psychology

Teratogens and Developmental Psychology
To put a definition plainly, teratogens are agents responsible for countless birth defects. Research found suggests over eight hundred known teratogens. In this paper, you will find interesting facts based on research, the relationship between teratogens and developmental psychology and some personal views based on the information and research found for this piece.

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Psychology of Altruism and Morality

Psychology of Altruism and Morality
The two competing theoretical frameworks that attempt to explain the development of morality are cognitive-behavioral and cognitive-developmental. The cognitive-behavioral approach is taken by Liebert, and the cognitive-developmental approach is taken by Kohlberg.

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