Creative Writing: The Story Of The Three Little Pigs

Creative Writing: The Story Of The Three Little Pigs
1. Upon a time there lived a homely hog woman, and her three straplings.
They lived in a bare brush hut in the forest, and they did live in squalor, and
they were tortured by many hooligans and wild beasts.

2. On one day, a wolf came to pester forsooth. And he did huff and he
did blow, and he did blow yon pighut down. The hog woman did send her young into
the wilderness to escape the beast, and they did so. Thus the wolf did eat the
poor hog woman.



A Bird's-Eye View of Wolves

Wolves are a widely studied species in Yellowstone. Since wolves were reintroduced to the park after an absence of almost 80 years, scientists spend a lot of time studying the animals' unique behavior.



Three Little Pigs Roleplay: The Wolf's Defense Before the Judge

Three Little Pigs Roleplay: The Wolf's Defense Before the Judge
Dear judge, I stand before you on the fine summer evening for my innocence of the story of me eating the three little pigs. I?ll try to be respectful as I can, but it?s not really necessary. How can someone be polite when he or she is so guilty! The story about me and three pigs are viewed in a totally mistaken way. So I am here to show you the truth, but I want you to keep one thing in mind. Because this story became so popular among others, I am little cautious that there will be a fixed idea about wolves and pigs. Most people think wolves are big and bad- even in the story I am called as ?The Big Bad Wolf? So, people tend to blame me about killing three pigs even though they don?t know the situation well enough. Judge, you should never judge animals by the way we look.



An Introduction To Spanish Grammar

When learning a new language, it is always useful to be familiar with its main grammatical units. This constitutes the first necessary step in order to understand and create meaningful speech.

Here are the main grammatical elements in Spanish and some useful information about them:

Nouns:
A noun is a word which is mostly used to refer to a person or thing. All nouns in Spanish have a gender, meaning that they are either masculine or feminine. For example, “niсo” (boy) ...



Liar Liar

Liar Liar
Stephen Glass was a young writer whose misinformation and fabrications, although found humorous by his co-workers, swayed the public opinion and effected many lives; including his. Like many professionals, Mr. Glass was skilled at what he did. He was a valued by his colleagues and had an almost unbreakable bond with them. All was well and dandy at The New Republic till Mr. Glass?s career came crashing down on his face like the twin towers of 9-11. Most of his work at The New Republic was falsified. He lied to himself, his boss, his co-workers, and the public. With the mendacity of course comes terrible and sometimes life altering consequences. One might ask these questions. Why did Mr. Glass lie? What did he lie about? And what consequences did it bring about?



The Ring by Isak Dinesen

The Ring by Isak Dinesen
In Isak Dinesen?s story titled ?The Ring,? there are a lot of cause and effect details. There are many causes and effects that all tie together. The first cause I noticed was Sigismund and his wife Lovisa, called Lise by her husband, went for a walk on their land. The effect of this walk was they talked to Mathias. This conversation with Mathias was the cause of Lise and Sigismund hearing the story of the thief that killed sheep like a wolf. Then, Mathias and Sigismund began to examine some sick lambs.



Cry,wolf

Such myths and legends have portrayed the wolf as a threat to human existence. Feared as cold-blooded killers, they were hated and persecuted. Wolves were not merely shot and killed; they were tortured as well. In what was believed to be a battle between good and evil, wolves were poisoned, drawn and quartered, doused with gasoline and set on fire, and, in some cases, left with their mouths wired shut to starve (Begley 53).



Wolves, Wild, Again

Wolves, Wild, Again
For my last web paper, I thought I?d return to one of my childhood obsessions ? wolves. Ever since seeing a cartoon rendition of the story ?Mowgli?s Brothers? from The Jungle Book (the real thing, not the horrible Disney ?interpretations? of it) I fell in love with the idea of wolf-hood. Wolves were once an essential part of our ?American culture? and although we drove them away and killed them off in our own country long ago, their importance in the American mind has not decreased. I remembered hearing about their ?reintroduction? to America several years ago, but I was younger then and didn?t remember or understand much of what actually happened. And with the start of middle school, I was much too preoccupied with homework and cliques and all the other things that made middle school a living hell to worry much about the fate of my canine heroes.



A Great Loneliness

A plea for understanding of wolves and their place in our world.



Wildlife Preservation in Thinking Like a Mountain

Wildlife Preservation in Thinking Like a Mountain
In Thinking Like a Mountain, the author, Aldo Leopold, writes of the importance of wildlife preservation through examples of the symbiotic relationship of animals and plant-life with a mountain. He asks the reader to perceive the processes of a mountainous environment in an unusual way. Aldo Leopold wants the reader to ?think? like a mountain instead of thinking of only the immediate, or as the hunter did. Taking away one feature of an ecosystem may eventually destroy everything else that that environment is composed of. Nature and wildness is essential for the well being of life on this earth.
The excerpt begins by telling of the echoing sound of a wolf?s cry. Every creature has a different perception of the meaning of that howl, while the mountain has a different view as well. A deer might be alarmed by it and flee. A hunter may become more alert and trigger-happy. All the while, it?s a comfortably soothing sound for the mountain.