Identify the Effects of Actions We Commit in the Effect Essay

Identify the Effects of Actions We Commit in the Effect Essay
Identify the Effects of Actions We Commit in the Effect Essay
An Effect Essay Should Trace the Effects to its Root Causes


When assigned to write an essay on something’s effect, you have to first delve into the causes of it. When students are assigned to write an effect essay they need to provide the causes of it as well. Therefore, this type of essay is the same as writing a cause and effect essay.
What are the Effects of Global Warming?

This is a good topic for the essay. In order to discuss the effects of global warming you need to first research on the causes of global warming. The evaporation of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, the polluting of air and water are some of these causes. When you are writing your effect essay, it is important for you to provide a small description of the causes before moving on to the effects.









Water Vapor In The Atmosphere Affects Climate Changes

All through our atmosphere water vapor is present as an invisible gas. Through evaporation from the oceans about 90% of this water vapor joins the earth's atmosphere. As the ocean waters get heat from the sun, a part of the water transforms from a liquid to a gas and in the warm water that gas rises.

While the sun heats the water, more rapid movement of the water molecules starts. A number of these rapidly moving molecules succeed in detaching themselves of the water belo...









Investigating Factors that Affect the Time It Takes for a Hot Beaker of Water to Cool Down

Investigating Factors that Affect the Time It Takes for a Hot Beaker of Water to Cool Down
To investigate the factors that effect the time it takes for a hot beaker of water to cool down. Heat is generally transferred by conduction, convection and radiation and evaporation. All of these processes can happen simultaneously but it is likely that one will give the greater heat exchange. Here is a description of the following processes that will affect my experiment: Evaporation === This could cool down the water, as when the water evaporates it will take the heat away with it in the same way evaporating sweat cools down our bodies. If I use a lid this could slow down the process. As the water vapour will not be able to escape into the air as quickly as it would normally, keeping the heat in for longer.









Exploring Hurricanes

Exploring Hurricanes
A hurricane is a server tropical storm that forms in the southern Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Mexico or in the eastern Pacific Ocean. They have different names. They are called hurricane (in Atlantic ocean), typhoons (in Indian ocean) and cyclone (in pacific ocean). Hurricanes gather heat and energy through contact with warm ocean waters. Evaporation from the seawater increases their power. Hurricanes are the most devastating things on the planet. They look like large expanse of cloud and its up to 1000 kms wide. It is up to 12000 meters high. Hurricanes rotate in an anti-clockwise direction around an "eye.? It?s like a funnel. The hot air rises up through the ?eye? making low pressure. They contain lots of thunderstorms. [image] Hurricanes are major hazard which can causes considerable loss of life and damage properties and the economy of a country. It?s the most powerful natural hazards on the world. Hurricanes need warm tropical oceans, moisture and light winds above them.









Emergency Preparation Tips for Typhoons

Almost all countries near major ocean bodies are plagued occasionally by the occurrence of typhoons.









Some Unusual Properties of Water

Some Unusual Properties of Water
Water molecules attract each other as a result of hydrogen bonding. This ionic attraction is 1/20 as strong as covalent bond in water?s liquid form. They form, break and re-form with great frequency; each hydrogen bond last only a few trillionths of a second, but the molecules bond promiscuously to a succession of partners. At any instant, a substantial percentage of all the water molecules are bonded to their neighbors, giving water more structure than other liquids. Collectively, this phenomenon is known as cohesion. A related property of cohesion is adhesion, a water molecule?s attraction to other polar surfaces. This is, again, directly attributed to water?s high polarity. Hydrophilic substances/materials, having similar strong polarity, are attracted to water through polar interactions. If you have ever tried to separate two glass slides stuck together with a film of water, you can appreciate how tightly water adheres to glass, a hydrophilic substance. (Water Module)









Investigating the Movement of Water Into and Out of Plant Cells by Osmosis

Investigating the Movement of Water Into and Out of Plant Cells by Osmosis
The aim of this experiment is to investigate the movement of water into and out of plant cells by osmosis. The cells chosen for study will be taken from potato tubers as they provide a ready supply of uniform material. Background Information Any substance dissolved in water is called a solute; a solvent is a liquid that is able to dissolve another substance, (a solute), to form a solution. The water content of plants varies depending on environmental conditions. In land plants it plays a vital role in structural support and mineral transport and thus a lack of water may lead to wilting or possibly death. Water is mainly absorbed through the roots, which are covered in specially adapted root hair cells, with large surface areas and thin cell walls to aid absorption by osmosis. The evaporation of water through stomata on plant leaves causes a transpiration stream, causing the water to be drawn up through xylem vessels. Osmosis is the flow of water molecules by diffusion through a partially permeable membrane from areas of high water potential (low solute concentrations) to regions of low water potential (high solute concentrations). All plant cell membranes are partially permeable, which means they allow some substances to penetrate them but not others. Whether water enters the cell by osmosis will depend on the balance between external and internal solute and water potentials. If the solutions on each side of the partially permeable membrane are of equal water or solute potential, then there will be no net movement of water molecules across the membrane. This is called an equilibrium state and the solutions are referred to as being isotonic.









Investigating Transpiration in Plants

Investigating Transpiration in Plants
Investigating Transpiration in Plants Hypothesis I predict that the plant will loose more water through transpiration when the fan is closer to the plant. I think that the distance of the fan from the plant and the water loss are inversely proportional, that is the greater the distance between fan and plant, the smaller the percentage loss of mass. I predict also that at a certain distance, the fan will no longer have an effect, or minimal effect, on the transpiration of the plant and the water loss will be constant. At this point the best fit line will be a near-horizontal line close to the axis, showing virtually zero water loss (excluding evaporation and other effects). These two predictions together suggest that the best fit for the two trends described will be a curve as shown.. Analysis (see graph overleaf) ========= The graph shows the relationship between the distance of the fan from the plant, and the % change of mass in the plant. From the graph, I can see that:- 1. The plant is losing water/transpiring when placed near a fan, because all the % changes in mass are negative numbers, and this shows the mass is going down. 2. There is an anomalous result at 100cm. This is so far away from the other readings that it should be disregarded. 3. There is a pattern in my results, disregarding the anomalous result. I can see that there is the greatest water loss when the fan is closest and least at the furthest distance. For example, at 40cm the % change of mass is -0.31%, and at 60cm the % change of mass is -0.28. It is losing more water when the fan is closest, so the water loss is inversely proportional to the distance of the fan from the plant. The line of best fit illustrates this trend.









Investigating Osmotic Effects on Plant Cells

Investigating Osmotic Effects on Plant Cells
Introduction ==== Water is not only the medium in which metabolic reactions occur but it provides skeletal support and thus is vital for plants. Animal cells are not used to demonstrate osmotic effect in this study because it would raise moral and ethical issues in regards to animal rights and the use of animals in scientific experimentation. Also animal cells don?t have cell walls so if they were in dilute solutions the cell membrane would expand and eventually split. This type of change due to osmosis would be difficult to measure. A plant cell (fig 1) maintains its shape due to the cell wall being rigid and the cell wall pushing outwards onto it. Water will enter a cell by osmosis. Osmosis is the movement of water molecules from a dilute solution to a concentrated solution through a selectively permeable membrane (fig 2). When a plant cell gains water the vacuole expands causing the cell to stretch and become larger. The cell is turgid (fig 3). This occurs when the cell is surrounded by a more dilute solution. If a plant cell is put in a more concentrated solution then what is in, its vacuole becomes flaccid. The cell is plasmalysed. This is because water travels from a dilute solution to a concentrated solution by osmosis.









Polar Bear Experiment

Polar Bear Experiment
olar Bear Experiment Aim === I am going to investigate how the size of a Polar Bear affects its loss of heat. I will be doing this by using beakers with hot water to represent the Polar Bears. ================= Variables ===== There are many factors that determine how quickly or slowly heat is lost. The factors are as follows: amount of water, shape, temperature and surface area to volume ratio, insulation and types of Beaker. I am going to investigate how variations in surface area: volume ratios in beakers lead to variations in heat loss. In order to make a fair test I will need to keep all other variables the same, these variables are amount of water, shape, temperature, insulation and type of beaker. The amount of water will have to be regulated because if I kept the amount of water the same there would not be a variation in mass and so the experiment would not give as clear results so I will be filling the beakers to half their full capacity. Prediction == I predict that in the smallest beaker the heat-loss will be the greatest and in the largest beaker the heat-loss will be the smallest. This is because with the small beaker there are a lot of spaces for the heat to escape from and there is little mass in the middle and so heat is lost quickly. The large beakers have a surface area larger than the small beakers but have a smaller surface area: Mass ratio because they have a very big mass. This means although heat escapes quickly it can not cool the centre of the water as quickly as with the small beaker because it has a larger Surface Area: Mass ratio.