Stay Alive: Earthquake Emergency Preparation Tips

Earthquakes are among the most devastating natural disasters.



Kobe Earthquake Essay

Kobe Earthquake Essay
Kobe Earthquake Essay
Before we give you some information for the Kobe earthquake essay, let us give you some general details. Kobe is the capital city of the Hoygo Prefecture in Japan. What is more, it is one of the biggest port cities in Japan with a population of about 1.5 million people. You also have to know that the earthquakes are very common for Japan and weak earthquakes occur almost everyday.

Yet, the Kobe (or Great Hanshin) earthquake was not that ordinary. It was the strongest earthquake since 1923 when the Great Kanto earthquake hit Japan and took 140,000 million lives.

So, let us see what information you can introduce in the Kobe earthquake essays.



Earthquake Essays

Earthquake Essays
A theme of natural disaster is one of those that are most favorable for students. This is because everybody knows something about this certain natural cataclysm or was even a witness of it. So, your listeners automatically become involved in the discussion and interested. We will consider earthquake essays in this article and will tell you what information you should look for and treat, if you want to develop them successfully.



The Damaging Effects of the Kobe Earthquake in 1995

The Damaging Effects of the Kobe Earthquake in 1995
The earth?s surface is not all one big piece. It is broke down into several different pieces called plates. Each plate moves a few centimetres a year. The place were two plates join up we call a plate boundary. Major earthquakes and volcanoes eruptions take place at these plate boundaries. Japan is at the boundary of three plates. It is located were the pacific and the Philippians plates move towards the Eurasian plate. As the two plates meet the Eurasian plate they are forced downwards and under the Eurasian plate. The movement has resulted in lots of earthquakes and volcanoes all over the country killing many people and destroying much land and crops.



A cause/effect essay

A cause/effect essay
A cause/effect essay explains...
- why earthquakes happen and what the consequences are;
- what happens to a child after parents divorce.



Seismic Waves and Earthquakes

Seismic Waves and Earthquakes
Longitudinal waves ? the vibration goes forwards and backwards along the direction of travel. Think of sound. Sound is a series of collisions of particles. In air a drum skin vibrates (for example). As this skin goes up it pushes all the air particles up and they compress together. These will then push into the air particles above them and cause them to do the same. The sound travels through the air as a series of collisions. A good way to see this is to put some marbles between two long rulers. If you make one marble move along it will go as far as the next marble, hit it and stop. The one it hit will move along to the next one and hit that ? and so on. Another way to see longitudinal waves would be to use a slinky (a giant spring). If you stretch it out a bit the take one end and push it forwards and back you will see the spring?s coils bunch together. The ?bunching? of the coils will pass along the spring. The individual coils only go forwards and back a little way. Sound waves are examples of longitudinal waves. What are Transverse waves? Transverse waves vibrate sideways. Think of waves over water. These are transverse waves. The wave travels across the surface of the water but the individual molecules of water on the surface go UP and down, not sideways. Watch a piece of wood on the water. It bobs up and down. The vibrations are at 90 degrees to the direction of travel. Other examples of transverse waves are waves along a rope (think how you make the wave ? by moving the rope sideways) and all the electromagnetic spectrum waves ? radio waves, microwaves, infra red, visible light, ultra violet, X-rays and gamma rays. What is a seismic wave? These are waves from vibrations in the Earth (core, mantle, oceans), which also occur on other planets, for example the moon. They can be natural ? due to earthquakes, volcanic eruptions or meteor strikes - or man-made ? due to explosions or anything that thumps the earth hard



A cause/effect essay explains..

A cause/effect essay explains..
A cause/effect essay explains...
- why earthquakes happen and what the consequences are;
- what happens to a child after parents divorce.

The cause and effect essay explains the reasons of the event or interprets the consequences of the event.



The Physics Of An Earthquake

The Physics Of An Earthquake
Earthquakes are vibrations produced in the earth?s outer layer, or crust, when forces pushing on a mass of rock overcome the friction holding the rock in place and blocks of rock slip against each other. The vibrations can range from barely noticeable to verry destructive. There are six types of shock waves. Two are classified as body waves which means they travel through the earth?s interior and the other four are surface waves. The waves are changed by the rock types or formations they hit. Primary or compressional waves (P waves) send particles moveing back and forth in the same direction as the waves are traveling, secondary or transverse shear waves (S waves) send vibrations perpendicular to their direction of travel. P waves always travel at higher velocities than S waves. Three general classes of earthquakes are now recognized as tectonic, volcanic, and artificially produced. The tectonic variety is by far the most destructive. The most commen cause of tectonic quakes is stresses by movements of the dozen of major and minor plates that make up the earth?s crust . Most tectonic quakes occur at the boundaries of these plates, in zones where one plate slides past another



Levels of Development Affect the Ability to Manage Natural Hazards

Levels of Development Affect the Ability to Manage Natural Hazards
A natural hazard is an event that occurs without the influence of man. It is an event which contains a level of possible danger. Examples of natural hazards are those such as hurricanes, earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. Development and levels of development are locations where the state of developing (expanding) is taking place. Where a city or town is expanding and building more buildings and structural locations. The management of an event is the way in which the event itself is controlled. The two types of natural hazards that I will be discussing in relation to levels of development are hurricanes and earthquakes. This is as they both effect locations differently as they are both different types of hazards. An earthquake is a tectonic hazard and a hurricane is a climatic hazard. Levels of development affect the ability to manage a hurricane as the more development there is, the harder it is to control the affect of the hurricane. This is as the more development there is, the more chance of the hurricane causing a bigger affect. An example of this is Hurricane Katrina. Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans a developed city on the coast of the United States. As the city is developed, the hurricane was able to cause a big affect and people were not able to manage it too well although many did leave the city in search for a safer location



10 Most Devastating Earthquakes of All Time

10 Most Devastating Earthquakes of All Time
10 Most Devastating Earthquakes of All Time
1960 Valdivia earthquake: The Great Chilean Earthquake on May 22, 1960. It is the most powerful earthquake ever recorded, rated at 9.5 magnitude. It caused tsunamis in Chile, Hawaii, Japan, the Philippines, eastern New Zealand, southeast Australia, and Alaska. Estimates of the death toll range from 2,231 to 6,000. The monetary cost ranges between 400 to 800 million US dollars, or 2.9 to 5.8 billion in 2010 dollars.

2004 Indian Ocean earthquake: The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake had an epicenter off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia, and caused devastating tsunamis along the Indian Ocean, including Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, and Thailand. Its magnitude was between 9.1 and 9.3. It is one of the deadliest natural disasters in recorded history, killing nearly 230,000 people.

1964 Alaska earthquake: The 1964 Alaska earthquake is known as the Great Alaska Earthquake. It hit south-central Alaska at a magnitude of 9.2. The earthquake lasted nearly 5 minutes, and is the most powerful recorded earthquake in US and North American history. There were 131 deaths directly caused by the earthquake and its resulting tsunamis.