The Power Sruggle in the Film, Matewan

The Power Sruggle in the Film, Matewan
The film Matewan brings to life the workings of a small West Virginia coal-mining town in the 1920?s. Stone Mountain, as the town was called, existed for mining exclusively. Every resident of the town worked for the Stone Mountain Coal Company. The company was the dominant force in the community, acting as a feudal lord. It owned all the land, residential areas and restaurants. In this particular town residents had no other choice than to work for the Coal Company because it had monopoly control over all the resources thus creating a feudal economic system. The miners were forced into a bondage contract with the company, because of the lack of choice they had regarding their employment, which is a fundamental element in a feudal system. The owners of the Stone Mountain Coal Company who profit from the coal generated never actually stepped foot on the Stone Mountain mine land.

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Determining Overdeterminism: An Informal Reflection

Determining Overdeterminism: An Informal Reflection
Economics has always been for me a system of curves. There are supply ones and demand ones and curves that would belly up or down. In every class, my high school Economics teacher, a man approaching his late fifties, would rail on about the wonders of capitalism. Being a two-time divorcee and therefore a man of the capitalistic world, he accredited the bulk of his knowledge through life experiences, particularly those involving divorce. I remember sitting through one of his classes and thinking that he resembled some type of new-born evangelist preaching to us about the awesome power of capital and what joy it can bring. I have always wondered, however, what the world of economics would be like without a system of charts that determine the outcome of lives. College started me off in finding other economic theories that contradicts what my high school teacher has ingrained in me for years: Neo-classic economics is unflawed and absolute.

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The Significance of John in Brave New World

The Significance of John in Brave New World
In Brave New World, there are three societies: the civilized society of Bernard and Mustapha Mond, the savage society of John and Linda, and the old society, which is not explicitly in the book but is described by the characters. These societies are vastly different. The old society is 20th century Western society; the civilized society creates people and conditions them for happiness and stability; and the savage society is very far behind the civilized society technologically, and is very religious. John is a very important character in the novel because he represents the link between all three of these societies.

John?s mother was created in the civilized society and lived there until John was accidentally conceived. She had to move to the savage society, and John was born and raised there. John had a connection to civilized society from an early age from hearing stories from his mother. He also came across a book of Shakespeare and by reading it, learned about old society. These however, are just preliminary connections for the bridges that will soon be built.

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Cloning is Ethically and Morally Wrong

Cloning is Ethically and Morally Wrong
The question shakes us all to our very souls. For humans to consider the cloning of one another forces them all to question the very concepts of right and wrong. The cloning of any species, whether they be human or non-human, is ethically and morally wrong. Scientists and ethicists alike have debated the implications of human and non-human cloning extensively since 1997 when scientists at the Roslin Institute in Scotland produced Dolly. No direct conclusions have been drawn, but compelling arguments state that cloning of both human and non-human species results in harmful physical and psychological effects on both groups. The following issues dealing with cloning and its ethical and moral implications will be addressed: cloning of human beings would result in severe psychological effects in the cloned child, and that the cloning of non-human species subjects them to unethical or moral treatment for human needs.

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We Must Have the Right to Choose Euthanasia

We Must Have the Right to Choose Euthanasia
There are many sides to the dilemma of whether or not euthanasia

should be carried out. There is the question of morality, the question of

active versus passive euthanasia and the question of when euthanasia should

be put into use. None of these questions are totally cut and dry. There

seem to be more gray areas within this issue than there are black and white.


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Elie Wiesel's Night

	 Elie Wiesel's Night
"For more than half an hour he stayed there, struggling between life and

death, dying in slow agony under our eyes. And we had to look him full in the

face. He was still alive when I passed in front of him. His tongue was still

red, his eyes were not yet glazed. Behind me I heard [a] man asking: Where

is God now?"

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The Extinction Event and Life in the Post-Apocalyptic Greenhouse

The Extinction Event and Life in the Post-Apocalyptic Greenhouse
The biggest mass extinction of the past 600 million years (My), the end-Permian event (251 My ago), witnessed the loss of as much as 95% of all species on Earth. Key questions for biologists concern what combination of environmental changes could possibly have had such a devastating effect, the scale and pattern of species loss, and the nature of the recovery. New studies on dating the event, contemporary volcanic activity, and the anatomy of the environmental crisis have changed our perspectives dramatically in the past five years. Evidence on causation is equivocal, with support for either an asteroid impact or mass volcanism, but the latter seems most probable.
The rest of this article spends time speculating through the advances in technology and the reanalyzation of old evidence to determine various cataclysmic events that happened millions of years ago. There are many sections in this article that discuss the methods used to determine the closet possible dates and the sequence in which they follow. There are also sections in this article which discuss methods used for the evidence of impact, eruption and how reading the environmental changes can help paleontologists determine conclusions and narrow the perspectives of paleontologists (scientists) and popular culture as a whole.

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Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation
Soon after the Revolutionary War in America, a new government was started when the Articles of Confederation (Articles) were adopted by the Continental Congress. The Articles set up a democratic government that gave the States the power to make their own laws and to enforce them. However, the Articles were ineffective and failed to provide a strong government. During this Critical Period in the history of the United States, regionalism and anarchy were growing because of the following reasons. 1) The Continental Congress controlled public affairs but there was nothing in the Articles that gave Congress the power to enforce laws or unify the States. 2) There was no solid monetary system to ensure that taxes would be paid or to protect commerce, both nationally and foreign trade. 3) The country lacked unity and strength because there was no leadership.
The Articles were ineffective because Congress only had the power to recommend actions to the States. It could not enforce its recommendations or laws. Each State had its own constitution, monetary system, and means to enforce the law. Each State had a stronger commitment to the State laws and to the State?s own self interests than to the recommendations of Congress. Regionalism pitted one State against another, which decreased the sense of unity in the country. For example, when Congress recommended an impost, or duty, on imported goods, the State of Rhode Island voted to reject the idea because they felt it was unfair and was against the constitution of the State (Document A).

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American Revolution

American Revolution
Many factors influences the American rebellion known as the American Revolution. Though political influences existed, the American Revolution was primarily an economic rebellion, because of conflict over taxation and representation in Parliament. The colonists had strong beliefs that the English government was unfair and often tyrannical. The conflicts over trade, taxes, and government representation brought about the revolution that began shaping the United States as it is today.

Although there were many economic influences on the American Revolution, these were not the primary causes. The colonists believed that the king of England, King George iii at the time, was too controlling over the colonies, with tyrannical leadership. This is shown in the Declaration of Independence, declaring the United States free from ?absolute Tyranny over the States.? To add to this conflict, British forces were attempting to intimidate the colonists into submission. The colonist?s attitude towards this policy was that it only gave them more cause and justification for violence. The general belief among to colonists was that it was God?s will that America and Britain be separated, and God?s will was a pretty strong proponent and motivation for them. In 1775, the colonists took up arms against the British troops in the colonies. They met at the Battle of Lexington and Concord, and some of the captured American soldiers were being executed. With all of these events, the adversity towards the English was growing.

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Essay on Voltaire's Candide - Optimism in Candide

	 Essay on Voltaire's Candide - Optimism in Candide
During the age of Enlightenment, the philosophes believed that reason could be used to explain everything. The philosophes believed that people could make the world a better place to live in. Voltaire is against such optimism. Ian Bell Says ?The ?optimist? argument then, was complex and sophisticated, but like all ironists Voltaire chose to simplify it to the extent that it seemed complacent and absurd, and he went on to cast doubt on our chances of ever securing ?eternal happiness??(1-2). According to Voltaire true happiness can only be experienced in an unreal world. The multitudes of disasters that Candide endures after leaving Eldorado culminate in his eventual abandonment of optimism. Candide loses four of his sheep laden with priceless jewels due to natural causes, and then sees his two remaining sheep stolen, and the local magistrate indifferent to the theft. ?Certainly, [says Candide,] if everything goes well, it is in Eldorado and not in the rest of the world? (42). Candide goes a step further, ?Oh Pangloss, cried Candide, you have no notion of these abominations! I?m through, I must give up your optimism after all. What?s optimism? said Cacambo. Alas, said Candide, it is a mania for saying things are well when one is in hell? (40). Candide?s enthusiastic view of life is contrasted with, and challenged by suffering that he endures throughout the book. Hence, Voltaire uses the book to satirize the foolishness of optimism.



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