Assessment of Children?s Behaviour

Assessment of Children?s Behaviour
The exercise of observing and assessing children formalises the link between theory and practice. A great deal of observing a child today is focussed on what?s wrong with the child, and how we can intervene to help that particular child. Early childhood specialist Carolyn Seefeldt agrees, ? observing is probably the oldest, most frequently used and most rewarding method of assessing children, their growth, development and learning.? (A practical guide to child observation, Christine Hobart) It is important to know how to observe in order to collect the necessary data in the most useful, accurate and efficient way. The value of carefully planned observation and assessment cannot be over emphasised. Observing children helps the observer to get a true picture of the particular child?s development, any potential triggers and any incidents that may occur. Observation also reduces the possibility of children being unfairly labelled, which can create its own set of problems. In order for any observation to have any value, it is important that the observer is as objective as possible and that several observations take place. This is to ensure that the observation is fair and accurate.

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The Impacts of Malaria

The Impacts of Malaria
Approximately 300 million people are affected worldwide by malaria and between 1 and 1.5 million people die from it every year. Malaria is now mainly confined to Africa, Asia and Latin America having previously been widespread across the world. The problems of controlling malaria in these countries are heightened due to insufficient health structures and poor socioeconomic conditions. The situation has become more complicated over the last few years with the increase in resistance to the drugs normally used to combat the parasite that causes the disease. Malaria is a serious, parasitic infection that is spread by the bite of certain mosquitoes. A parasite is an organism that survives by living inside a larger organism, called a host. Malaria is spread in three ways. The most common is by the bite of an infected female Anopheles mosquito. However, malaria can also be spread through a transfusion of infected blood or by sharing a needle with an infected person. There are four different species of parasites that cause malaria.

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Changing Women's Roles

Changing Women's Roles
Women started to challenge their domestic roles over time by using the war, westward expansion and abolitionist movements and by ultimately taking advantage of the liberties they were given. Because they were proven to be sufficiently skillful in activites during the Revolution and Civil War they were able to expand their roles after the war both socially and also in education.

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Diabetes

Diabetes
Diabetes is a very well known disorder. Nearly eighteen million people in the United States alone have diabetes. Diabetes is a serious illness, and there are about 1,800 new cases are being diagnosed each day. To completely understand diabetes, a person must first know how the body works with the disease and then determine which type of diabetes he/she has. There are three types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes, Type 2 diabetes, and Gestational diabetes. There are many factors that play into the development of this disease. Type 1 diabetes is a disease that affects the way your body uses food. In Type 2 the body still makes insulin, but is not using it correctly, resulting in elevated blood sugars. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy, but goes away after birth. These are the three different types of diabetes, and what type of effect they have on the body. There are many different scientists who are out there trying to come up with a cure for diabetes, and hopefully in the near future they will do so.

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Guilt in the Scarlet Letter

Guilt in the Scarlet Letter
Guilt is a feeling of responsibility or remorse for some offense, crime, wrong, whether real or imagined. There are different types of guilt. Guilt can be caused by a physical thing a person did that he isn?t proud of, or wanted to hide, can be something a person imagined he did to someone or something else, or can be caused when a person did something to his God or religion. Everyone at some time in his or her life has a run in with guilt, and it has a different impact on each person. People, who are feeling guilty because of something they did or said, can influence how other people act and feel. Some people are affected worse by guilt than others, for example, Dimmesdale from The Scarlet Letter. Talked about in The Scarlet Letter, Dimmesdale, a man with the deepest guilt, was responsible for the moral well-being of his people. He went against his teachings, committed adultery, and left the woman to suffer publicly alone while he stayed like a hero in the town. On the other hand, sometimes the masses are affected by one person?s guilt. He was affected much more by guilt, because he didn?t tell anyone of what he had done. By keeping guilt internalized, a person ultimately ends up hurting himself. More than seventy percent of all things that make people feel guilty are found out later on in their life by other people. Guilt has three categories that it affects the most in people: physical, mental, and spiritual.

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Extent True Happiness Can Be Possible With Limited Freedom in Brave New World

Extent True Happiness Can Be Possible With Limited Freedom in Brave New World
Imagine, you were talking to your best friend about how you were feeling that day, and some how the word got to your boss about you are being too emotional outside of work hours, and you are now about to be send to an island with ?like-minded? people. The last thing you feel is happy, but you are not allowed to be unhappy, because you grew up without this emotion, so instead you inject pills to better your mood. This is the environment that Aldous Huxley presents in Brave New World, a futuristic society where humans are bred in bottles and have been manipulated to fit a certain criteria, or ?conditioned? from the time they are embryos. In this new society, emotions, religion and culture are sacrificed for social stability. People are not allowed any knowledge of the past, and everything is only explained to the most basic of truth. The freedoms we enjoy today are almost completely abolished. Naturally, we associate happiness with the ability to do whatever your want in life, so if we didn?t have this ability, can we still be happy in life? In the novel, it seems to be achievable on the surface, but when you look deeper, it shows that human beings respond to their environment in different ways. The reason that the citizens of this new society seem happy is a relative thing; they have little experience with mental pain. The society they live in is loveless, and they are rather unintelligent.

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Systems Thinking

Systems Thinking
Systems thinking has its foundation in the field of system dynamics, founded in 1956 by mit professor Jay Forrester. Professor Forrester recognized the need for a better way of testing new ideas about social systems, in the same way we can test ideas in engineering. Systems thinking allows people to make their understanding of social systems explicit and improve them in the same way that people can use engineering principles to make explicit and improve their understanding of mechanical systems.

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Supporting Legalizing Marijuana

Supporting Legalizing Marijuana
For the last few years, there has been much media hype about Cannabis. There have been
talks about medical Marijuana, allowing farmers to use low thc types of marijuana for
hemp, and completely legalizing Marijuana. The fiery debates have been brought to my
attention by the media just recently. Being a teenager myself, I have become quite
interested in Marijuana. Although most of my friends have tried Marijuana, and Marijuana
is quite easily available where I lived in California, I have never tried it myself. I
remember the time when my friend, Jeremy, was selling Marijuana right out of his locker.
It was last year during PE, and I distinctly remember it. When I realized what he was
doing, I asked if I could look at the Marijuana because I had never seen any before. When
he showed it to me, it was not what I had expected. It was in a little plastic bag,
called a dime (10 dollars worth), and was a sticky darkish brown with little red hairs.
The street name for this sub-specie of Cannabis was Skunk.

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Ambition and Individualism In Macbeth

Ambition and Individualism In Macbeth
In the tragedy Macbeth by William Shakespeare it gives the most complete characterization of the individualist, as a person, consciously and consistently puts the fact that expresses its own interests above the interests of surrounding people. Macbeth covered ambitious passion, in a hurry to release their intelligence from moral principles and personal rules, considering them a nuisance, empty prejudices. But no matter how free the main character of prejudice, it still plagued by remorse, it scares the bloody shadow of the murdered Banquo.

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The Physiological Effects of Alcohol on the Human Body

The Physiological Effects of Alcohol on the Human Body
Introduction: In this essay I?m going to write about the effects in which alcohol has on various organs in the human body. I will also describe how alcohol affects humans psychologically. This will demonstrate clearly the impact that alcohol has towards human beings. What is Alcohol? The scientific name for alcohol is Ethanol; CH3CH2OH, a group of chemical compounds whose molecules contain a hydroxyl group, -OH, bonded to a carbon atom. Pure Ethanol is a colourless liquid. Alcohol and Your Brain: In order to understand how alcohol can effect the brain you need to be able to understand how the brain works. (See Figure 1) Figure 1 Lateral surface of left half of brain

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